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Total Received Papers: 504 | Total Accepted Papers: 83

Total Rejected Papers: 421 | Acceptance Rate: 16.46%

S. No

Volume-7 Issue-5S, January 2019, ISSN: 2277-3878 (Online)
Published By: Blue Eyes Intelligence Engineering & Sciences Publication

Page No.

1.

Authors:

S. Sreejana

Paper Title:

Farewell to Orator-Listener Mode of Teaching and Welcome to The Role as Language Engineers

Abstract: In the present scenario, the inclination towards orator-listener mode of teaching has become obsolete among public, and taken diverse practices among students. The reasons for this may be the development of technology and usage of electronic gadgets. This paper focuses mainly on activity based teaching methodology that is to be practised in the ESL (English as a second language) class rooms. The main difficulty for the teachers of English in the present scenario is to make the students shine in every aspects of their academic performance and also to give liberty in their academic thoughts and deeds.The objective of this paper is to execute activity oriented methodology and exercise to enhance communication skills among the selective informants by interactive learning atmosphere. 

Keywords: Communication Skills, Activity based teaching, interactive learning atmosphere

References:

  1. Bialystok, E. (2007), “Acquisition of Literacy in Bilingual Children: A Frame work for Research”, Language Learning.
  2. Geva E (2006), “Second-language oral proficiency and second language literacy”, Lawrence Erlbaum.
  3. Malathy, P (2008),“Language Comprehension among MQ and GQ Students”, Language in India 8: 3.
  4. Malathy, P (2009), “Teaching Technical Jargon through Word Formation to the Students of Engineering and Technology – Problems and Some Perspectives on Strategies”, Language in India 9; 6.
  5. Malathy, P (2010), The Role of Compounding in Technical English Prescribed for Engineering Students in Tamilnadu, Language in India 10 : 7.
  6. Reimer, Marc J. (2002), “English and Communication Skills for Global Engineer”, Global Journal of Engineering Education, 6 (1), 9.3.

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2.

Authors:

Tissaa Tony. C

Paper Title:

Faith and Emotional Intelligence

Abstract: This paper attempts to bring out the crux of Emotional Intelligence and how every individual can analyse his or her emotions. Self-analysis is the first step as it helps in introspectionof one’s thoughts, emotions and responses. This leads to awareness and awareness in turnshelps to generate the right emotion which ultimately leads to success in all domains of life.Factors which hinder the development of Emotional Intelligence like fear, anger, depressionare analysed with biblical examples. Religious teachings may serve as a guiding light as suchprecepts are found to be time-tested. Faith is inevitable in building up of self confidence and esteem.Thus research has proved that religiosity helps indeveloping emotional intelligence.

Keywords:  Emotional Intelligence, hindrances, development, faith, fear,courage, stress, Anxiety.

References:

1. Adeyemo, D. A., &Adeleye, A. T. (2008). Emotional intelligence, religiosity and selfefficacyas predictors of psychological well-being among secondary school adolescents inOgbomoso, Nigeria. Europe’s Journal of Psychology, 4(1)
2. Adnan, M. H. A., Desa, A., Sulaiman, W. S. W., Ahmad, M. I., &Mokhtar, D. M. (2015).
3. Emotional and Spiritual Intelligence among Secondary School StudentsJurnalPsikologiMalaysia, 28(2).
4. Adnan, H. A., Desa, A., Sulaiman, W. S. W., Ahmad, M. I., &Mokhtar, D. M. (2014).
5. Emotional Intelligence and Religious Orientation among Secondary School Students.JurnalPsikologi Malaysia, 28(2), 01-17.
6. Blake, W., & Sweeney, M. (2004). A poison tree (pp. p-158). ProQuest LLC.
7. Bible, H. (1995). New american standard bible. Grand Rapids: World.
8. Goleman, D. P. (1995). Emotional intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ for character, health and lifelong achievement.
9. Hagner, D. A. (1995). Matthew 14-28 (Vol. 14). Thomas Nelson Incorporated.
10. Jayalakshmi, V., &Magdalin, S. (2015). Emotional intelligence, resilience and mental healthof women college students. Journal of Psychosocial Research, 10(2), 401.
11. Mavroveli, S., Petrides, K. V., Rieffe, C., & Bakker, F. (2007). Trait emotional intelligence, psychological well‐being and peer‐rated social competence in adolescence. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 25(2), 263-275.
12. Khaledian, M., Amjadian, S., &Pardegi, K. (2013). The relationship between accountingstudents emotional intelligence (EQ) and test anxiety and also their academicachievements. European Journal of Experimental Biology, 3(2), 585-591.
13. Rendtorff, R. (2005). The Canonical Hebrew Bible: A Theology of the Old Testament (Vol.7). Deo Pub.
14. Smith, M. S. (2007). " Your people shall be my people": Family and covenant in Ruth 1: 16-17. The Catholic Biblical Quarterly, 69(2), 242-258.
15. Sood, S., Bakhshi, A., & Gupta, R. (2012). Relationship between personality traits, spiritualintelligence and well being in university students. Journal of Education and Practice, 3(10),55-60.
16. Salas-Wright, C. P., Lombe, M., Nebbitt, V. E., Saltzman, L. Y., &Tirmazi, T. (2017). Self-Efficacy, Religiosity, and Crime: Profiles of African American Youth in Urban HousingCommunities. Victims & Offenders, 1-18.
17. Scheindlin, R. P. (Ed.). (1999). The Book of Job. WW Norton & Company.
18.https://www.researchgate.net/publication/275828423_Emotional_Intelligence_ and_ReligiousOrientation_among_Secondary_School_Students[accessed Jul 4, 2017].

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3.

Authors:

A. Sulekha, R. Francina Pracila Mary, Tharmalingam

Paper Title:

Impact of Inflation of the Household Spending Power

Abstract: Rise in inflation influences different category of people differently. From common man’s point of view inflation means increase in price of goods and services on day to day bases. People with fixed income employed in either public or private sector organisations or Self-employed, working in unorganised sector are considered as victims of rising inflation, as inflation influences the consumption, spending and investment practices of the households. This study aims to assess the relationship between inflation and individual household spending. The empirical findings of this study complement the economic theories and evidences that inflation also increases the cost of living, price of commodities and reduces the opportunities of getting goods jobs. This situation directly influences households’ income and their spending capacities.

Keywords: Household Income, Spending, Consumption Power and Inflation

References:

  1. Aarati Krishnan (2017), Why You Don’t Feel The Record-Low Inflation, The Hindu, 18th
  2. http://www.rediff.com/business/report/infla-6-types-of-inflation-that-affect-our-daily-finances/20150601.htm
  3. Indian Inflation Rate (2012-18), https://tradingeconomics.com/india/inflation-cpi
  4. Ranjay Vardhan (2014), An Analysis of Impact of Inflation on Female Headed Households, EPRA International Journal of Economic and Business Review, Volume.No.2, Issue.No.5, ISSN: 2347 – 9671, PP: 1-5, May.
  5. RBI pegs retail inflation at 4.8% for second half of FY19, Times of India, 1st August, 2018.

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4.

Authors:

V. Selvam, D. Ashok, P. Pratheepkanth

Paper Title:

Awareness and Perception of Health Issues Among Rural Women

Abstract: According to a United Nations report on healthcare, about 75% of the healthcare infrastructure, including medical experts and doctors are concentrated in urban areas in India even through only 27% of the population lives in urban parts. India meets the global average in the number of doctors, but 74% of its doctors cater to a third of the urban population, or no more than 442 million people, according to a KPMG report released in 2017. The country is 81% short of doctors at rural community health centres and the private segment accounts for 63% of hospital beds, according to government health and family welfare statistics. Even though the government is putting in activeefforts to enhance the current fitness care systems by opening primary health centres and helping the rural poor women and children via free medical amenities, qualitative and quantitative accessibility of primary healthcare services is very less in remove village areas. The reason budget in India estimates for health at an appreciable growth of more than 27%. From Rs.37,061.55crore in 2016-17, the budget estimate for 2017-18 has been increased to net Rs.47,352.51 crore. This will help to appear tertiary care, human resources for health and medical education and to support national health mission. For the rural population, health care necessities are different than the urban due to various social economic reasons. Rural populationparticularly women is mainly engaged in agriculture labour movement and they are many challenges like issues in agriculture, health issues, no appropriate primary education and less awareness on various government schemes and benefits. Based on the above various issues, the present study aims to find out theawareness and perception of health issues among women in rural area in Vellore district, Tamil Nadu in India. The findings of the study found that, the respondents have full awareness and perception about health issues and also they were aware of the various schemes and initiatives taken by the government to uplift the rural women and children to live healthy and better life in rural area

Keywords: Awareness, Perception, Health issues, government initiative and Development of rural women

References:

  1. JG, Van Ginneken JK, (1988) Maternal education and child survival in developing countries, The search for pathways of influence,27, No.12, pp.1357-1368.
  2. Census (2011), Government of India.
  3. Coffey, D, R Khera and D Spears (2014) “Women’s Status and Children’s Height in India, Evidence from Joint Rural Household,” Working Paper, Rice Initiative for the Stay of Economics, Houston.
  4. ChetanChauhan (2018), Rural health: Emerging challenges, Kurukshetra: A Journal on Rural Development,66, No.10, pp.35-38.
  5. Frank Transer, (2006) Methodology for optimizing location of new primary health care facilities in rural communities: A case study in Kwazulunatal, South Africa, Journal of Epidemiology Community Health, Vol.60, pp.846-850.
  6. GuhaMazumdar p, Gupta K. (2007) Indian system of medicine and women’s health: a client’s perspective, Journal of Biosocial Science,39, No.6, pp.819- 841.
  7. Hair, J.F, Anderson, R.E, Tatham, F.L, and Black, W.C, (1998),Multivariate analysis, Englewood, CO; Prentice Hall International.
  8. Jennings L, Yebadokpo AS, Affo J, Agbodbe M,(2010), Antenatal counselling in maternal and new-born care: Use of on aids to improve health worker performance and maternal understanding in Benin, BMC Pregnancy and Child birth, Vol.10, pp.75.
  9. Kaveri Gill, (2009), A Primary Evaluation of Service Delivery under the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) Findings from a study in Andhra Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and Rajasthan, Working Paper PEO, Planning Commission of India.
  10. LewandoHundt G, Alzaroo S, Hasna F, Alsmerian M, (2012), The provision of accessible, acceptable health care in rural remote areas and the right to health: Bedouin in the North East region of Jordan, Social Science and Medicine,74, No.1, pp.36-43.
  11. MeenashiGautham, Erika Binnendik, RukKoren, David M. Dror, (2011), First we go to the small doctor, First contact for curative health care sought by rural communities in Andhra Pradesh & Orissa, India Journal Medical Research,134, No.5, pp.627- 638.
  12. Ray SK, Basu SS, Basu AK (2011),Assessment of rural health care delivery system in some areas of west Bengal- An overview, India Journal of Public Health,55, No.2, pp.70-80.
  13. Smith, L. C., and L. Haddad (2015), Reducing Child Under nutrition: Past Drivers and Priorities for the Post-MDG Era,World Development,68, pp.180-204.
  14. Srivastava RK, Kansan S, Tiwari VK, Piang L, Chand R, Nandan D, (2009), Assessment of utilization of RCH services and client satisfaction at different levels of health facilities in Varanasi District, Indian Journal of Public Health,53, No.3,pp.183-189.
  15. Shashi Rani (2017), Rural health: Health infrastructure, equity and quality, Kurukshetra: A Journal on Rural Development, 65, No.9, pp.29-33.
  16. Shefali Chopra (2017), Tackling health hazards in rural India, Kurukshetra: A Journal on Rural Development,65, No.9, pp.22-25. Health care for all: The national health policy 2017
  17. Srinivas, V (2017), Health care for all: The national health policy 2017, Kurukshetra: A Journal on Rural Development, 65, No.9, pp.8-11.
  18. World Bank (2008), Environmental health and child survival: epidemiology, economics, experience. Washington, DC, World Bank,

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5.

Authors:

S. Sreejana

Paper Title:

English Mass Media: The World-Wide Knowledge Bank for Learners

Abstract: In the present scenario, English is considered to be a mandatory language professionally and officially all over the world. Almost all the people have a tendency to have good English communication skills. English is the most common foreign language also. Therefore in every walk of life, it has become mandatory for the students to have good English communication skills. The paper focuses on how Mass media helps the students acquire English language fast. The most common list of media that was widely used 20 years ago is broadcast, film, print media, audio recording and reproduction. While these mediums played a huge role in bringing about the transformation that we are witnessing across the world, the current game changer has been the Internet. The paper emphasizes on how the usage of internet helps the learnersto have English language competency and how mass media acts as world-wide knowledge bank for students. 

Keywords: Communication skills, Mass media, English language.

References:

  1. Brady, K., Holcomb, L., & Smith, B, The use of alternative social networking sites in higher education settings: A case study of the e-learning benefits of Ning in education. Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 9(2), 151-170, 2010.
  2. Browning, L., Gerlich, R., &Westermann, L, The new HD classroom: A “Hyper Diverse” approach to engaging with students. Journal of Instructional Pedagogies, 1-10, 2011.Retrieved from: http://www.aabri.com/manuscripts/10701.pdf.
  3. Cassidy, E., Britsch, J., Griffin, G., Manolovitz, T., Shen, L., &Turney, L, Higher education and emerging technologies: Student usage, preferences, and lessons for library services. Reference& User Services Quarterly, 50(4), 380-391, 2011.
  4. Chen, B. &Bryer, T, Investigating instructional strategies for using social media in formal and informal learning. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 13(1), 87-100, 2012.
  5. Ebner M., Lienhardt, C., Rohs, M. & Meyer, I, Microblogs in higher education—a chance to facilitate informal and process-oriented learning. Computers & Education, 55, 92-100, 2010.
  6. Veletsianos, G. & Navarrete, C, Online social networks as forming learning environments: learner experiences and activities. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 13(1), 144-166, 2012.

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6.

Authors:

V. Suganthi

Paper Title:

Rediscovering The Past And Technology as in James Blish’s “Surface Tension”

Abstract: James Blish’s short story “Surface Tension” is about the humans who colonize the universe. The story is spun around a fantastic concept and set in an extremely exotic locale. It is about a society gone to the primitive times and now rediscovering the wonders of technology.Humans from Earth travel to distant planets that have similar earth-like qualities, including an atmosphere, and they create humans who can survive there. They colonize them by sending a “seedship” and create new life forms adapted to live there. The spaceship they travel crashes on a water planet. Though the crew survives in the crash, all the forms of communication are broken. The germ cell bank also is no longer with them and they have to manage with whatever they are left with. So they create genetically changed seeds in the form of water adapted humanoids who have to fight their way in the antagonist environment under water in order that human race survives on earth even after they become extinct. Those humanoids develop a spaceship which enables them to pierce the previously impenetrable surface tension of the water and travel through the hostile space to other worlds in other puddles of water breaking the barriers between water and the air above it. The concept of ancestral memory, Noam Chomsky’s theory of genetic semantic memory and T.S.Eliot’s theory on tradition and individual talent form the basis for this short story.

Keywords: rediscovering the past, technology, humanoids, ancestral memory, genetic semantic memory, tradition and individual talent.

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface_Tension_(short_story). Retrieved on 01.07.2018.
  2. http://variety-sf.blogspot.com/2008/03/james-blish-surface-tension-novelette.htmlRetrieved on 01.07.2018.
  3. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17828354-surface-tension. Retrieved on 01.07.2018.
  4. http://variety-sf.blogspot.com/2008/03/james-blish-surface-tension-novelette.html. Retrieved on 01.07.2018.
  5. https://www.scribd.com/doc/23396343/Blish-James-Surface-Tension. Retrieved on 01.07.2018.

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7.

Authors:

Thanam Subramaniam, Zaiton Samdin, Sridar Ramachandran, Puvaneswaran Kunasekaran

Paper Title:

Memorable Ecotourism Experiences in Taman Negara, Pahang

Abstract: Memorable Ecotourism Experiences (MEEs) play a key role in obtaining tourists’ satisfaction and loyalty in sustaining the ecotourism destination. Although, MTEs has been recognised as a crucial area of tourism studies since 2010, but still there is a lack of study that explore all dimensions or constructs of MTEs. Most of the recent studies only tested eight significant constructs and ignored the remaining constructs. Therefore, this study aim to examine the dimensions that influences the memorable ecotourism experiences in Taman Negara, Pahang Malaysia. Subsequently, to propose a MEEs model. In order to fill the literature gap, a pilot test was conducted in April 2018 with a sample of 40 tourists to Taman Negara, Pahang, Malaysia. These preliminary results indicated that 15 out of 22 constructs (hedonism, knowledge, meaningfulness, local culture, novelty-familiarity, involvement, refreshing, destination attributes, service, participation, freeing, adverse feeling, socialization, nature and education awareness) were significantly influencing the MEEs in Taman Negara. The study recommends further studies to be conducted to explore all 22 proposed constructs in a variety of ecotourism sector. 

Keywords: Ecotourism, Memorable Ecotourism Experiences, Destination Loyalty, Taman Negara

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8.

Authors:

Mahaganapathy Dass, Sarjit S Gill, Puvaneswaran Kunasekaran

Paper Title:

Exploring the status of Community Capacity Building towards urban poverty alleviation in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Abstract: This paper presents the level of community capacity building attained by the urban poor minority group of My Kasih program participants towards urban poverty alleviation in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. MyKasih is one of the Non-governmental Organization focused to combat urban poverty issues in the country. This study was conducted at Kuala Lumpur urban squatters’ concentrated destination in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Qualitative approach was used where in-depth interview was used as the data collection method. The results show that the community does not have full capacity and they are still dependent on outsiders’ assistance. It is hoped that the findings of this study will contribute to existing body of knowledge within urban poverty and community development disciplines.

Keywords:  Urban poverty, community capacity building, urban poverty

References:

  1. Ajayi, I. O., A. S. Jegede, C. O. Falade, & J. Sommerfeld, 2013. Assessing resources for implementing a community directed intervention (CDI) strategy in delivering multiple health interventions in urban poor communities in Southwestern Nigeria: a qualitative study. Infectious diseases of poverty, 2(1), 25.
  2. Atkinson, R., & P. Willis, 2006. Community capacity building: A practical guide. University of Tasmania: Housing and Community Research Unit.
  3. Boccia, D., J. Hargreaves, B. L. De Stavola, K. Fielding, A. Schaap, , P. Godfrey-Faussett, & H. Ayles, 2011. The association between household socioeconomic position and prevalent tuberculosis in Zambia: a case-control study. PloS one, 6(6), e20824.
  4. Cavaye J.M., 2000. The Role of Government in Community Capacity Building. Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries Information Series QI99804. Queensland Government.
  5. Eade, D., 1997. Capacity-building: An Approach to People-centred Development. Great Britain: OXFAM.
  6. Frank, F. & A. Smith, 1999. The Community Development Handbook A Tool To Build Community Capacity. Kanada: Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada.
  7. James, V. U., 1998. Building The Capacities of Developing Countries. In Capacity Building in Developing Countries: Human and Environmental DimensionsUSA: Praeger Publishers
  8. Noya, A., 2009. Putting Community Capacity in Context. In Community Capacity Building: Creating A Better Future Together. Edited by Noya Antonella, Clarence Emma, Craig Gary. France: OECD
  9. Nussbaum, M. C., 2006. Poverty and Human Functioning: Capabilities as fundamental entitlements. Poverty and inequality, 1990, 47-75.
  10. Rahim M. Sail & A.S. Asnarulkhadi, 2010. Community Development through Community Capacity Building: A Social Science Perspective. Journal of American Science, 6(2):68-76.
  11. Sen, A., 1981. Poverty and famines: an essay on entitlement and deprivation. Oxford university press.
  12. Zaman, H., 1999. Assessing the Impact of Micro-credit on Poverty and Vulnerability in Bangladesh (No. 2145). The World Bank.

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9.

Authors:

Mustafa Abd Aziz, Shazali Johari, Puvaneswaran Kunasekaran

Paper Title:

Local Community’s Participation and Empowerment Level Towards Sustainable Heritage Tourism in Taiping, Malaysia

Abstract: The aim of this study is to holistically understand the role of community participation and resources in influencing the sustainable heritage tourism practice of the Taiping local community in Malaysia. Descriptive statistics used as the indicator of community participation and empowerment towards sustainable tourism practice. Overall, participation and empowerment levels were at a higher level. Although there is good level of participation, the empowerment level is not very high. This is most likely because of majority of the respondents were not involved in tourism and they were not empowered in tourism planning. The infrastructure development in Perak is still in infancy stage. Since Taiping is the second largest city in Perak, it is suggested that a public transport hub should be developed in Taiping so that it is easily accessed by tourists. Therefore, tourism stakeholders should work closely to promote Taiping as a tourist destination. 

Keywords:  Heritage tourism, community resources, Malaysia

References:

  1. Chhabra, D., Healy, R., & Healy, R., 2003. Staged authenticity and heritage tourism. Annals of Tourism Research, 30(3), 703.
  2. Cole, S., 2006. Information and empowerment: The keys to achieving sustainable tourism. Journal of sustainable tourism, 14(6), 629-644.
  3. Garrod, B., & Fyall, A., 2000. Managing heritage tourism. Annals of Tourism Research, 27(3), 683.
  4. Hall, C. M., & Page, S. J., 2016. The Routledge Handbook of Tourism in Asia. Abingdon: Routledge.
  5. Harrison, R., 2009. What is heritage? In R. Harrison (Ed.), Understanding the Politics of Heritage (p. 9). Manchester: Manchester University Press.
  6. Isa, N. K. M., Yunos, M. Y. M., Ismail, N. A., Ismail, K., Marzuki, M., & Ibrahim, M. H., 2015. Establishing a community engagement framework for sustainable tourism: the case of Taiping heritage town Malaysia. Advances in Environmental Biology, 9(27), 501-509.
  7. Ismail, N., Masron, T., & Ahmad, A., 2014. Cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia: Issues and challenges. Georgetown: EDP Sciences.
  8. Kunasekaran, , Gill, S. S., and Talib, A. T., 2016. The role of cultural commoditization towards a sustainable tourism practice of the Mah Meri community in Malaysia. International Journal of Social Policy and Society Vol. 11, 16-26.
  9. Kunasekaran, , Gill, S. S., and Talib, A. T., 2015. Community Resources as the Indigenous Tourism Product of the Mah Meri People in Malaysia. Journal of Sustainable Development. Vol. 8, No.( 6), 78-87.
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  11. Rosenfeld, R. A., 2017. Cultural and heritage tourism. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Raymond_Rosenfeld /publication/237461371_CULTURAL_AND_HERITAGE_TOURISM/links /540f3e580cf2df04e75a2ab7.pdf
  12. Sebele, L. S., 2010. Community-based tourism ventures, benefits and challenges: Khama rhino sanctuary trust, central district, Botswana. Tourism management, 31(1), 136-146.
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  15. Timothy, D. J., & Tosun, C., 2003. Arguments for community participation in the tourism development process. Journal of Tourism Studies, 14(2), 2.
  16. Tourism Malaysia, 2017. Malaysia's 2016 Tourist Arrivals Grow 4.0%. Retrieved from http://www.tourism.gov.my/media/view/malaysia-s-2016-tourist-arrivals-grow-4-0
  17. Tosun, C., 2000. Limits to community participation in the tourism development process in developing countries. Tourism Management, 21, 615.
  18. Wells, R., 1982. Tourism planning in a presently developing country: The case of Malaysia. Tourism Management, 101.

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10.

Authors:

Kavitha Arunasalam

Paper Title:

A Study on the Relationship between an Individual’s Personality and Tax Compliance

Abstract: The issue of tax compliance has been studied widely from various field of study yet, tax non-compliance is still a problem for not only Malaysia, but for most of the countries around the world. Economy and non-economy factors of tax non-compliance has been studied; still minimal focus has been given on how personality impact the attitude of tax compliance. This study is conducted by the researcher to observe the pattern of tax compliance from the perspective of employees in Kuala Lumpur. The researcher has incorporated the element of personality from the Big Five Personality Traits to identify how does an individual personality effects compliance decision. The researcher conducted this study through a qualitative research mode where the researcher used the Big Five Inventory traits to identify the personality of the taxpayers. Taxpayers weregrouped according to personality and taxpayer’s extend towards tax compliance analyzed using a set of interview questions.This study indicates that there were relationship between personality and compliance where a group of personality choose to perceive tax compliance as not necessary since they are not aware of their tax obligations. The result from this study provides specific insights to the policymakers on how an individual’s personality is associated with tax compliance and enable them to implement suitable strategies to minimize non-compliance by designing tax awareness programs according to an individual’s personality. 

Keywords: Tax Compliance, Personality, Big Five Personality traits

References:

  1. Alabede, J. O., Idris, K. M., & Ariffin, Z. (2011). Determinants of tax compliance behavior: A Proposed Model for Nigeria, 78(78).
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  3. Alabede, J. O., Ariffin, Z. Z., & Idris, K. M. (2011). Individual taxpayers’ attitude and compliance behaviour in Nigeria : The moderating role of financial condition and risk preference. Journal of Accounting and Taxation, 3(September), 91–104.
  4. Alm, J., Bahl, R., & Murray, M. N. (2016). Tax Structure and Tax Compliance Author ( s ): James Alm , Roy Bahl and Matthew N . Murray Source : The Review of Economics and Statistics , Vol . 72 , No . 4 ( Nov ., 1990 ), pp . 603-613 Published by : The MIT Press Stable URL : http://www.jstor.org/sta, 72(4), 603–613.
  5. Alm, J., & Torgler, B. (2011). Do Ethics Matter? Tax Compliance and Morality. Journal of Business Ethics, 101(4), 635–651. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-011-0761-9
  6. Bailey, C. D., Scott, I. J., & Hyde, J. C. (2015). Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting Article information : Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting, 14, 175–186. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1574-0765(2010)0000014011
  7. Bobek, D. D., Roberts, R. W., Sweeney, J. T., Bobek, D. D., Roberts, R. W., & Sweeney, J. T. (2016). The Social Norms of Tax Compliance : Evidence from Australia , Singapore , and the United States, 74(1), 49–64.
  8. Bobek, D. D., Roberts, R. W., Sweeney, J. T., & Donna, D. (2012). The Social Norms Evidence of Tax Compliance : and the United States, 74(1), 49–64.
  9. Cleary, D. (2013). A Survey on Attitudes and Behaviour towards Tax and Compliance, (September 2009).
  10. Cohen, J. (2011). Corporate Fraud and Managers’ Behavior : Evidence from the Press, (2010), 271–315. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-011-0857-2
  11. Dalamagas, B. (2011). A Dynamic Approach to Tax Evasion. Public Finance Review, 39(2), 309–326. https://doi.org/10.1177/1091142110386213
  12. d’Andria, D. (2011). The Effects of Tax Evasion on the Choice between Personal and Corporate Income Taxation. Public Finance Review, 39(5), 682–711. https://doi.org/10.1177/1091142111414135
  13. Davis, J. S., Hecht, G., & Perkins, J. D. (2000). Social Behaviors, Enforcement, and Compliance Dynamics. SSRN Electronic Journal, 78(1), 39–69. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.209869
  14. Engida, T. G., & Baisa, G. A. (2014). Factors influencing taxpayers’ Compliance with the tax system: An empirical study in Mekelle City, Ethiopia. eJournal of Tax Research, 12(2), 433–452.
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  18. Macgregor, J., Wilkinson, B., Kamleitner, B., Korunka, C., & Kirchler, E. (2014). Advances in Taxation The Effect of Economic Patriotism on Tax Morale and Attitudes Toward Tax Compliance. Advances in Taxation (Vol. 20). Emerald Group Publishing Limited. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1058-7497(2012)0000020009
  19. Maciejovsky, B., Schwarzenberger, H., & Kirchler, E. (2012). Rationality Versus Emotions: The Case of Tax Ethics and Compliance. Journal of Business Ethics, 109(3), 339–350. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-011-1132-2
  20. Saad, N. (2012). Tax Non-Compliance Behaviour: Taxpayers View. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 65(ICIBSoS), 344–351. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2012.11.132
  21. Santhanamery, T., & Ramayah, T. (2015). The Effect of Personality Traits on User Continuance Usage Intention of e-Filing System. Global Business Review, 16(1), 1–20. https://doi.org/10.7763/JOEBM.2013.V1.6
  22. Ser, P. C. (2013). Determinants of Tax Non-Compliance in Malaysia (Doctoral Dissertation), (December), 123. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107415324.004
  23. Thức, N. T. (2013). A Review of Factors impacting Tax Compliance Nguy ễ n Ti ế n Th ứ c MBA Viet Nam Graduate Academy of Social Sciences. Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences, 7(7), 476–479.
  24. Torgler, B. (2002). Speaking to theorists and searching for facts : tax morale. Journal of Economic Surveys, 16(5), 657–683. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-6419.00185
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11.

Authors:

Vikneswaran Manual, Wai San

Paper Title:

Dynamic Relationship Between Trade Balance and Macroeconomic Elements: Empirical Evidence From Emerging Economies in Malaysia

Abstract: Malaysia is very much dependent on foreign trade. As such it is critical to study the determinants of trade balance in Malaysia in order to improve trade balance and in turn, stabilize economy. Exports is one of the most important elements that drive Malaysia’s GDP ver the years. This study investigates the relationship of trade balance with other macroeconomic elements such as domestic income, exchange rates, inflation rates and money supply, covering a time span of 15 years from 2000 to 2015. This paper employs Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) model to examine the short run and the long run relationship between trade balance and other elements. Granger Causality also performed to investigate the relationship between the variables. The results indicate that domestic income, inflation rates and exchange rates appear to be significant that affect the trade balance while money supply turn out to be affecting the trade balance insignificantly. Future researchers can use other econometric measuring techniques such as Vector Error Correction or Ordinary Least Square method to investigate the relationship between macroeconomics with trade balance. Moreover, future research is also suggested to include other variables such as foreign income, government expenditure, and household consumption to explore more on the determinants of trade balance and produced a more refined result.

Keywords: Trade Balance, Malaysia, Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL)

References:

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Authors:

DK Nur’ Najmah, PG Haji Menudin, Nooraneda Mutalip Laidey

Paper Title:

Factors Affecting Customers’ Perception Toward Service Quality of Grab

Abstract: The emergence of technology integration and advance information enabled Transportation Network Companies (TNC) to provide on demand “ride-hailing" or "ridesharing" services such as Grab and Uber. Thus reducing customers’ dependency of taxi services. One survey conducted by The Land Public Transport Commission (SPAD) Malaysia in 2015revealed that 80 per cent Malaysian customers prefer TNC than taxi due to many factors such as trustworthiness, convenience, reliability, etc. Since then limited research had been conducted on the factors affecting customers’ perception of service quality of the main TNC in Malaysia - Grab. It is important for Grab to identify their competitive advantage to provide quality service. Therefore, the objective of this study is to examine the factors affecting customers’ perception towards service quality of Grab. The three identified dimensions of customers’ perception are service quality, customer satisfaction and brand image which were analyzed and it was revealed that although stronger customer satisfaction and brand image may lead to favorable customers’ perception, service quality does not necessarily translate into positive customers’ perception. In conclusion, in order to gain competitive advantage, Grab should always maintain its service quality and uphold its brand image in order to capture positive customers’ perception. It is also imperative for Grab to improve its service quality to meet customer satisfaction which will lead to a positive perception, as well as attracting more potential customers.

Keywords: customer perception, Grab, SERVQUAL, Transportation Network Companies.

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Authors:

Poh Yee Thoo, Shazali Johari, Mohd Hafizal Ismail, Lai Ling Yee

Paper Title:

Understanding The Role of Memorable Tourism Experiences in Loyalty at Giant Panda Conservation Centre, Zoo Negara Malaysia

Abstract: Memorable tourism experiences (MTEs) have recently emerged to become an important study for tourism destinations to compete in this rapid growing marketplace. Unlike visitors’ loyalty, it has always been a vital objective of service providers. Positive MTEs have been hypothesized for being able to develop future behavioral intentions in the visitors such as revisiting a destination. There is currently still lack of studies regarding the relationship between these two dimensions especially at Giant Panda Conservation Centre (GPCC) in Zoo Negara Malaysia which was established in year 2014. GPCC is the enclosure of the two giant pandas loaned to Malaysia by China to mark the 40th Anniversary Diplomatic Relationship between the two countries. For GPCC, loyal visitors and also new visitors are crucial as the giant pandas will be here for 10 years. Therefore, this research examines whether MTEs can affect a visitor’s loyalty at GPCC in Zoo Negara. A quantitative method was used with a sample of 217 visitors and multiple regression analysis was carried out. The results showed that MTEs have a significant relationship with visitors loyalty. In a nutshell, it is essential for GPCC’s management to increase positive visitors’ MTEs in order to increase the number of loyal visitors who will revisit GPCC and provide positive Word of Mouth to their family and friends so that they will help to attract more new visitors.

Keywords: memorable tourism experience, loyalty, zoo negara, giant panda, behavioural intentions

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14.

Authors:

Poh Yee Thoo, Shazali Johari, Mohd Hafizal Ismail, Lai Ling Lee, Muhammad Luqman Hasan

Paper Title:

The Relationship Between Service Quality and Memorable Tourism Experience at Giant Panda Conservation Centre in Zoo Negara Malaysia

Abstract: Service quality has always been the highlight in service-based sectors especially in the tourism sector where experience is their primary product. However, to be successful in this highly competitive tourism industry, bestowing visitors with great service quality and increase their positive memorable tourism experiences (MTEs) are essential as satisfaction alone is proven to be insufficient.Zoo Negara is the oldest zoo in Malaysia, but it is one of the latest additions to the panda zoo around the world as it has been chosen to house a pair of giant pandas named Fu Wa (Xing Xing) and Feng Yi (Liang Liang) for 10 years. Therefore, this exploratory research examines whether service quality is an antecedent of MTEs for GPCC in Zoo Negara Malaysia. Many studies have been done at GPCC but none have linked service quality with the MTEs in their studies.This study seeks to increase their understanding of their service quality and MTEs, and nevertheless covers the gap between the two dimensions for zoo setting. Quantitative method has been used, and a purposive sampling approach has been employed. The data gathered were analysed using multiple regression analysis. Results indicated that service qualityis an antecedent of MTEs where both technical quality and functional quality have positive relationship with MTEs.This has bridged the gap for current literature. Hence, it is necessary for the management of Zoo Negara to enhance their service quality of GPCC so that more people will have positive MTEs that will eventually increase the possibility of a person to revisit it.

Keywords: service quality, memorable tourism experience, Zoo Negara Malaysia, technical quality, functional quality

References:

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15.

Authors:

Lai Ling Yee, Shazali Bin Johari, Diana Emang, Poh Yee Thoo, Muhammad, Luqman Hasan

Paper Title:

Motivational Factors of Women to Become Social Entrepreneurs in Lundu District, Sarawak

Abstract: Social entrepreneurship has become the attention of the scholars and practitioners for years in various countries as it is a tool which plays important roles in developing individuals, societies, and communities socially and economically. However, it is essential to study the motivations of the social entrepreneurs as it is yet to be theorised. Therefore, this study is to determine what motivates the women to become social entrepreneurs. A set of designed questionnaires with dual languages was used for the data collection. Motivational factors were measured on respondents’ agreement by using five-point Likert Scale. This study was targeted at women social entrepreneurs in Lundu District, Sarawak. The data collected was analysed by using the IBM SPSS. Through the samples of 150 women social entrepreneurs, the findings show that “Financial Independence” is the motivational factor that motivates women the most, which followed by “Contribution to Society” and “Need for Affiliation”. On the other hand, “Role Models Influence” is the least motivational factor for the women to join the ventures in social entrepreneurship. In a nutshell, this study provides the picture on what motivates the social entrepreneurs which can then be the reference for management to design strategies to attract more people to join social entrepreneurship as well as the reference for future related studies.

Keywords: social entrepreneurship, motivation, women, Lundu District, Sarawak

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16.

Authors:

Trishal Ashvin Kaur, Vikneswaran Manual, Meera Eeswaran

Paper Title:

The Volatility of The Malaysian Ringgit; Analyzing Its Impact on Economic Growth

Abstract: In an ideal Malaysian economy, the exchange rate functions at a stable, competitive and appropriate level to allow the nation to capitalize on growth and development capacities. However, the instability of market conditions and economic fundamentals have led to a volatile ringgit. In 2015, the ringgit was deemed Asia’s worst performer. With past researchers attributing exchange rates as crucial determinants of a country’s economic health, the impact of such volatility must be carefully analyzed and understood. This study investigates the impact of exchange rate volatility on economic growth in Malaysia from 2000-2016 due to the lack of research within this setting coupled with evidence of discrepancies (in terms of direction and significance of impact) among past literature. The multiple regression employs the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) method of estimation whereas the absolute percentage change model is applied to measure volatility. To develop a more robust model, the study incorporates the variables of exports, imports and foreign direct investment (FDI) as explanatory variables cum transmission channels. While the empirical analysis reports that the direct relationship between volatility and growth is insignificant, volatility significantly reduces Malaysian exports. In the long-run, this could substantially deteriorate the Malaysian economy due to its heavy reliance on trade. The researcher concludes by providing several recommendations to ensure the stability of the ringgit to assist the growth prospects of the Malaysia economy.

Keywords: exchange rate, volatility, Malaysia, economic growth.

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  59. Yildirim, Z. & Ivrendi, M., (2016). Exchange rate fluctuations and macroeconomic performance Evidence from four fast-growing emerging economies. Journal of Economic Studies, 43(5), pp. 678-698.
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17.

Authors:

Sireesha Prathi Gadapa, M. M. Mohamed Ubaidullah, Rajasegeran Ramasamy, Raja Rajeswari Ponnusamy

Paper Title:

Academic Timetable Optimization For Asia Pacific University, Malaysia using Graph Coloring Algorithm

Abstract: This paper proposes an optimized solution for timetable scheduling system (TTSS) at Asia Pacific University[APU], Malaysia. TTSS generates the students’ weekly timetable under given set of constraints and preferences such as lecturers, classroom availability, modules etc. Due to various coinciding problems (multiple intakes, various cohorts, academic calendar, increase in student population and limitations of resources), TTSS optimization is vital. This optimization of TTSS is known as Node-Point problem, for which there is no known polynomial algorithm, leads to time consuming problem to find an optimizesolution that grows rapidly with population size. Graph coloring algorithm is a heuristic approach to generate an automated system that will optimize the TTSS to provide a conducive learning environment for students and utilize absolute APU’s resources in an efficient way. The paper propose a user- friendly database system that applies graph vertex coloring approach associating with a data course matrix to overcome the problems of TTSS, APU.

Keywords: Graph coloring, Timetable scheduling system, Heuristic approach, Course matrix

References:

  1. Ayanegui, H. and Aragon.A.C (2009). A complete algorithm to solve the graph-coloring problem, 533(09), 107-108.
  2. Assi, M., Halawi, B. and Haraty, R.A. (2018). Genetic Algorithm Analysis using the Graph Coloring Method for Solving the University Timetable Problem. Procedia Computer Science, 126, 899-906.
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18.

Authors:

Mohammad Ashfaq Ruhomaun, Mitra Saeedi, Navaz Nagavhi

Paper Title:

The Effects of Selected Macro & Micro Economic Variables on Firm Performance for Listed Firms in the ‘Industrial Products’ Sector in Malaysia

Abstract: Firm performance is considered as an important indicator for investors while making investment decisions since it reflects a firm’s overall financial health. Hence, with business globalization and the fierce competition for market share among the companies, it is fundamental for a firm to maintain a high firm performance. It is an empirical question of how firm performance is influenced by economic factors. Therefore, this study is designed to investigate the effect of selected macro and micro economic variables on firm performance for listed firms in the ‘Industrial Products’ sector in Malaysia. Thus, this study explores and establishes the relationship exchange rate, interest rate, financial distress and derivatives usage as independent variables and firm performance as dependent variable. A dynamic panel data model has been employed in this study which comprises of 196 companies over a time period of 5 years (2012-2016). The relationship between the variables has been established via GMM as econometric analysis technique. The study reveals that exchange rate has a negative but not significant impact on firm performance. Moreover, both interest rate and financial distress have a negative and significant effect on firm performance. Finally, derivatives usage and an additional interaction term have a positive and significant effect on firm performance.

Keywords: firm performance; exchange rate; interest rate; financial distress; derivatives

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19.

Authors:

Chia Kar Man, Rohizan Ahmad, Tee Poh Kiong, Tajuddin A. Rashid

Paper Title:

Evaluation of service quality dimensions towards customer’s satisfaction of Ride-Hailing services in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Abstract: Ride-hailing services refers to transportation services booking through smart phone apps in collaboration with transportation network companies. In Malaysia, the ride hailing services have been formally legalized since July 2017 under the Commercial Vehicles Licensing Board Act 1987 and Land Public Transport Act 2010. According to Arcadis’ 2017 Sustainable Cities Mobility Index, Kuala Lumpur transportation system is ranked at 95th position out of 100 cities around the world. The introduction of ride-hailing services has provide not only an alternative for those who are dependent on public transportation, but it is also expected to ease the problems of congestion in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Focusing on ride-hailing services, this paper aims to analyze customer satisfaction of the services provided by analyzing the five service quality dimensions; tangibility, empathy, reliability, assurance and responsiveness. With the increasing numbers of ride hailing providers such as Grab, Riding Pink, PICKnGO, Dacsee and MULA, it is vital to determine the factors that lead to the customers’ satisfaction in order for the companies to be competitive. In this research, the SERVQUAL model is used to identify the gap between the ride hailing providers and the customers’ expectations of service quality provided. The overall findings conclude that all the five service dimensions have positive and significant correlations towards customer satisfaction.

Keywords: ride-hailing, customer satisfaction, service quality, public transportation

References:

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20.

Authors:

Sobana Manivannan, Lua Sharmini Satanam

Paper Title:

A Study on Factors that Influence the Cultural Adjustment Faced by the African and China Students in Higher Learning Institutions in Klang Valley

Abstract: There are numerous higher education institutions based in Malaysia successfully sustaining in the market with huge number of students from all around the world. Yet, there are a number of turnover rates where students fail to adapt the cultural differences while pursuing their studies in Malaysia. With this concern, this project aimed to identify the cultural adjustment faced by the African and China students in selected universities for the purpose of this project. Since there is only a few studies have analysed various factors that influence the cultural adjustment, this study intend to achieve the aim of the study which is to figure out the level of influence that the factors identified as independents variables such as perceived discrimination, language, social support and educational stressor towards the cultural adjustment faced by African and China students in the selected three higher learning institutions at Klang Valley, Malaysia. For this research, convenience sampling was utilized and 120 survey questionnaires were distributed to the African and China students in those universities. Then the 120 respondent’s responses were entered into SPSS version 23 one by one to collect descriptive and inferential statistics. At the beginning of the study the hypothesis formed in a way that the independent variables such as perceived discrimination and social support have correlation with cultural adjustment faced by African students but have no correlation towards the cultural adjustment faced by China student. The same thing goes to the educational stressor and language where these independent variables have correlation with the cultural adjustments faced by China students but have no correlation towards the cultural adjustment faced by African students. Meanwhile, the results revealed that perceived discrimination, language, educational stressor and social support are all have a positive relationship and have a correlation towards the cultural adjustment faced by African and China students in selected higher learning institutions. Whereby the null hypothesis formed for this study have proven wrong and the alternate hypothesis are all accepted and proven right in the data analysis made. The findings supported the results from some earlier studies and also bring out several new ideas such as African and China students do facing cultural adjustment due to the examined factors in this study.Thus, it is found that language, perceived discrimination, educational stressor and social support were positively related to the cultural adjustment faced by both African and China students. Furthermore, the results also have a great contribution to the theories built and previous studies on this scope.

Keywords: Cultural adjustment, perceived discrimination, educational stressor, social support

References:

  1. Kennedy, E. (2009). Personality and psychological adjustment during cross-cultural transitions: A study of the cultural fit proposition. [Accessed: 3 July 2017].
  2. Kyzar, K.B., Turnbull, A.P., Summers, J.A. and Gómez, V.A. (2012). The relationship of family support to family outcomes: A synthesis of key findings from research on severe disability. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities 37. pp. 31-44.
  3. Lee, L.-Y. andSukoco, B.M. (2008), The mediating effects of expatriate adjustment and operational capability on the success of expatriation. Social Behavior and Personality: An International Journal. 36(9). pp. 1191-1204. [Accessed: 3 July 2017].
  4. , A and Gasser (2005). Predicting Asian international students’ sociocultural adjustment: A test of two mediation models. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 29(5). pp. 561-576. [Accessed: 3 July 2017].
  5. Mehdizadeh (2005). Adjustment problems of Iranian international students in Scotland. International Education Journal. 6(4). pp. 484-493. [Accessed: 3 July 2017].
  6. Misra, R. and Castillo, L. G. (2004). Academic stress among college students: Comparison of American and international students. International Journal of Stress Management. 11. pp. 132–148. [Accessed: 3 July 2017].
  7. Saunders, M., Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A., (2009). Research methods for business students. 5th ed. Rotolito Lombarda: Pearson Education Limited.
  8. Sumer, S (2009). International Students’ Psychological and Sociocultural Adaptation in the United States. 34. pp. 1-74. [Accessed: 3 July 2017].

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21.

Authors:

David Lee, Dhamayanthi Arumugam, Nooradhanawati Binti Arifin

Paper Title:

A Study of Factors Influencing Personal Financial Planning among Young Working Adults in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Abstract: According to the survey, individuals’ confidence level in personal finance has decreased from 66 percent to 61 percent in 2011, and household debt in Malaysia also rose to a new high to 86.8 percent of GDP in 2013 from 80.5 in 2012. The failure in financial of individual also give the big impact to the economy, especially young adults which have been seen the future continuer. As such it is necessary to study the factors influencing the financial planning among the young working adult in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Socio-demographics, financial knowledge and literacy, financial attitude and financial planners have been taken into account as the factors. This study employs Cronbach Alpha, Chi-square, and multiple regression to help in determine the significant relationship between the variables. The results show that the factors studied appear to be significant and positively affect the financial planning. Future researchers can try to do qualitative research on this field in order to find a deeper understanding on each factors or even generate a new factor. Moreover, future research is also suggested to include the matured people in order to find the result which can be used to reflect the population in Malaysia. Last but not least, additional variables also can be taken into account such as macroeconomic factors and financial behaviour.

Keywords: Financial Planning, Financial Knowledge and Literacy, Financial Attitude

References:

  1. Agarwal, S. et al., 2015. Financila Literacy and Financial Planning: Evidence from India. Journal of Housing Economics, 4-21.
  2. Albeerdy, M. & Gharleghi, B., 2015. Determinants of the Financial Literacy among College Students in Malaysia. International Journal of Business Administration, 6(3), pp. 15-24.
  3. Boon, T. H., Yee, H. S. & Ting, H. W., 2011. Financial Literacy and Personal Financial Planning in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Internatioanl Journal of Economics and Management, 5(1), pp. 149-168.
  4. Borden, L. M., Lee, S.-A., Serido, J. & Collins, D., 2008. Changing College Students’ Financial Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior through Seminar Participation. Journal of Family Economic Issues, 29(1), pp. 23-40.
  5. com, 2017. GDP: 2002-2017, yearly, %, CEIC data. [Online]
    Available at: https://www.ceicdata.com/en/indicator/malaysia/household-debt--of-nominal-gdp
    [Accessed 1 April 2016].
  6. Chowa, G. A., Despard, M. & Akoto, I. O., 2012. Financial Knowledge and Attitudes of Youth in Ghana. YouthSave Research Brief, 12(37), pp. 1-7.
  7. Countrymeters, 2016. Malaysia Population. [Online]
    Available at: http://countrymeters.info/en/Malaysia
    [Accessed 1 April 2016].
  8. Cull, M., 2009. The Rise of the Financial Planning Industry. The Australasian Accounting Business & Finance Journal, 3(1), pp. 26-37.
  9. Deventer, M. V., Klerk, N. d. & Dye, A. L. B., 2014. African Generation Y Students’ Attitudes towards Personal Financial Planning. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences , 5(21), pp. 111-120.
  10. Greenwald, L. & Vanderhei, J., 2017. The 2017 Retirement Confidence Survey: Many Workers Lack Retirement Confidence and Feel Stressed About Retirement Preparations. Employee Benefit Reserach Institute , Issue 431, pp. 1-32.
  11. Hanna, S. D. & Lindamood, S., 2010. Quantifying the economic benefits of personal financial planning. Financial Services Review, Volume 19, pp. 111-127.
  12. Hayhoe, C. R., Leach, L. & Turner, P. R., 2009. Discriminating the number of credit cards held by college students using credit and money attitudes. Journal of Economic Psychology, Volume 20, pp. 643-656.
  13. Huston, S. J., 2010. Measuring Financial Literacy. The Journal of Consumer Affairs, Volume 44, pp. 296-316.
  14. Idris, F. H., Krishan, S. D. & Azmi, N., 2013. Relationship between financial literacy and financial distress among youths in Malaysia - An empirical study. Malaysian Journal of Society and Space, 9(4), pp. 106-117.
  15. Jalil, M. A., Razak, D. A. & Azam, S. F., 2013. Exploring Factors Influencing Financial Planning After retirement: Structural Equation Modeling Approach. American Journal of applied Science, 10(3), pp. 270-279.
  16. Lai, M.-M. & Tan, W.-K., 2009. An Emprical Analysis of Personal Financial Planning in Emerging Economy. European Journal of Economics, Finance and Administratives Sciences, Issue 16, pp. 99-111.
  17. Mien, N. T. N. & Thao, T. P., 2015. Factors Affecting Personal Financial Management Behaviors: Evidence From Vietnam. pp. 1-16.
  18. Mohd, R., Mohamad, S. & Nor, N., 2015. Understanding Financial Behaviour of Gen Y via Financial INtelligence Logit Ruler: A Preliminary Study. Dubai, 11th International Business and Social Science Research Conference.
  19. Robb, C. A. & Woodyard, A. S., 2011. Financial Knowledge and Best Practice Behavior. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, 22(1), pp. 60-70.
  20. Selcuk, E. A., 2015. Factors Influencing College Students’ Financial Behaviors in Turkey : Evidence from a National Survey. International Journal of Economics and Finance, 7(6), pp. 87-94.
  21. Shanmugam, A., Abidin, F. Z. & Tolos, H., 2017. Issues in Retirement Confidence among Working Adults in Malaysia: A Conceptual Paper. Journal of Economics and Finance , 8(6), pp. 1-11.
  22. Taft, M. K., Hosein, Z. Z., Mehrizi, S. M. T. & Roshan, A., 2013. The Relation between Financial Literacy, Financial Wellbeing and Financial Concerns. International Journal of Business and Management, 8(11), pp. 64-75.
  23. com, 2017. Malaysia Households Debt to GDP. [Online]
    Available at: https://tradingeconomics.com/malaysia/households-debt-to-gdp
    [Accessed 1 April 2016].
  24. Warschauer, T. & Sciglimpaglia, D., 2012. The economic benefits of personal financial planning : An emprical analysis. Financial Services Review, Volume 21, pp. 195-208.
  25. Xie, Y., 2000. Demography: Past, Present, and Future. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 95(450), pp. 670-673.
  26. Zait, A. & Bertea, P. e., 2014. Financial Literacy – Conceptual Definition and Proposed Approach for a Measurement Instrument. Journal of Accounting and Management, 4(3), pp. 37-42.

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22.

Authors:

Muhammad Luqman Hasan, Thoo Poh Yee, Yee Lai Ling, Shazali Johari, Diana Emang

Paper Title:

The Strength of Social Capital of Three Local Communities at Gunung Pueh National Park, Lundu, Sarawak

Abstract: Social capital is an important concept in identifying the connection and relationship of the community, which has three dimensions: bonding, bridging and linking social capital.Since nowadays the issues related to trust, criminal and relationship has been a serious problem in our community, hence the measurement to determine the strength of social capital dimension has been conducted. The initial process has been explored to identify the suitable social capital indicators. The result is then used to construct into an instrument comprising six indicators based on survey items and past studies namely participation in local community, proactive in social context, neighborhood connection, diversity and tolerance, feeling trust and safety and family and friends connection. This is a quantitative study involving 390 respondents with the self-administered questionnaire distributed in three communities at Gunung Pueh National Park which are Kampung Biawak, Kampung Sebako and Kampung Pueh. The result revealed that bonding social capital is strongly hold the communities followed by linking and bridging social capital. At the other hand, the result showed Kampung Pueh has the strongest overall social capital followed by Kampung Sebako and Kampung Biawak.

Keywords: Social capital, bonding, bridging, linking, community

References:

  1. Australian Bureau of Statistic, 2004. Australian social capital framework and indicators. Canberra: Government of Australia.
  2. Burns, Alvin & Ronald, 2008. Basic Marketing Research. 2nd ed. New Jersey: Pearson Education.
  3. Cote, S. & Healy, T., 2001. The well-being nations. The role of human and social capital, Paris: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Developmen, OECD.
  4. Grootaert, C. & van Bastelaer, T., 2001. Understanding and measuring social capital: A synthesis of findings and recommendations form the social capital iitiative. Washington, D.C: The World Bank.
  5. Hakim, A. et al., 2010. The relationship between social capital and quality of life among rural household in Terengganu, Malaysia. OIDA International Journal of Sustainable Development, 1(5), pp. 99-106.
  6. Ismail, R., Mahfodz, N. & Sulaiman, N., 2016. Tahap dan penentu indeks modal sosial di Malaysia. Kajian Malaysia, 34(2), pp. 101-121.
  7. Krishna, A., 2002. Enhancing political participation in democracies: What is the role of social capital?. Comparative Political Studies, 35(4), pp. 437-460.
  8. Lai Ling, Y. et al., 2018. Factors Influencing Visitors' Evaluation of Service Quality In Giant Panda Conservation Centre (GPCC), Zoo Negara. International Journal of Business and Society, Volume 19, pp. 140-158.
  9. Marzuki, A. et al., 2014. Community social capital in Malaysia: A pilot study. Asian Social Science, 10(12), p. 202.
  10. Office of National Statistic, 2006. General Household Survey, 2005 report, s.l.: United Kingdom.
  11. Onyx, J. & Bulen, P., 2000. Measuring social capital in five communities. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 36(1), pp. 23-42.
  12. Putnam, R., 2001. Social capital: measuremen and consequences. Canadian Journal of Policy Research, pp. 41-51.
  13. Putnam, R. D., 1993. What makes democracy work, Civic traditions in modern Italy. s.l.:Princeton University Press.
  14. Schuller, T., Baron, S. & Field, J., 2000. Social capital: A review and critique, in Baron, S., Field, J & Schuller, T (eds) Social capital: Critical perspectives. pp. 1-38.
  15. Seligman, A., 1997. The problem of trust. s.l.:Princeton University Press.
  16. Szreter, S. & Woolcock, M., 2004. Health by Association? Social Capital, Social Theory, and the Political Economiy of Public Health. International Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 33, pp. 650-667.
  17. Thoo Poh Yee & Shazali Johari, 2016. Visitor Satisfaction towards Facilities of the Giant Panda Conservations Centre, Zoo Negara Malaysia: An Exploratory Analysis. ASia- Pacific Journal of Innovation in Hospitality and Tourism, 5(3), pp. 71 -88.

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23.

Authors:

Suresh Balasingam, Dhamayanthi Arumugam, Kong Ai Hui

Paper Title:

The Challenges in Adopting and Implementing Integrated Reporting in Public Listed Companies in Malaysia

Abstract: Integrated Reporting has been launched in year 2013 by International Integrated Reporting Council (IIRC). IIRC has mentioned that ‘the primary purpose of an integrated report is to explain to providers of financial capital on how an organization creates value over time’. Hence, this framework has been released in order to provide principle-based guidance for the companies in creating an integrated reporting to meet the expectation of the stakeholders such as shareholders, suppliers and creditors. Therefore, it is important to study the potential challenges which might be happened in accessing the in PLCs in Malaysia. Therefore, the study aims to determine the current state of in Malaysia and subsequently identify the potential challenges when the organization is changing to adopt. The data used in this research will be primary data. Therefore, a set of questionnaires will be distributed to the public listed companies in order to collect the primary data. The questionnaire will be set in order to test the variables and the information of the respondents including their personal profile and company information will be recorded as anonymous. Likert Scale will be used for measuring the attitudes by asking the respondent to respond to a statement about the research.

Keywords: Integrated Reporting, Challenges, Malaysia

References:

  1. Abeysekera, I., 2013. A template for integrated reporting. Journal of Intellectual Capital, 14(2), pp. 227-245.
  2. ACCA, 2013. Understanding investors: directions for corporate reporting, l.: The Association of Chartered Certified Accountants.
  3. Adams, C. A., 2015. The International Integrated Reporting Council: A call to action. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 23-28.
  4. Adams, C. A., Potter, B., Singh, P. J. & York, J., 2016. Exploring the implications of integrated reporting for social investment (disclosures). The British Accounting Review, 283-296.
  5. Adams, S. & Simnett, R., 2011. Integrated Reporting: An Opportunity for Australia’s Not-for-Profit Sector. Australian Accounting Review, 21(3), pp. 292-301.
  6. AFM, 2016. Awareness of integrated reporting is increasing, further progress is needed. [Online] Available at: https://www.afm.nl/en/nieuws/2016/nov/in-balans-2016 [Accessed 31 July 2017].
  7. Baboukardos, D. & Rimmel, G., 2016. Value relevance of accounting information under an integrated reporting approach: A research note. Account. Public Policy, pp. 437-452.
  8. Black Sun & IIRC, 2014. Realizing the benefits: The impact of Integrated Reporting, l.: Black Sun & IIRC.
  9. Bommel, K. v., 2014. Towards a legitimate compromise? An exploration of Integrated Reporting in the Netherlands. Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 27(7), pp. 1157-1189.
  10. Burke, J. J. & Clark, C. E., 2016. The business case for integrated reporting: Insights from leading practitioners, regulators, and academics. Business Horizons, 273-283.
  11. Bursa Malaysia, 2017. List of Companies in Main Market. [Online] Available at: http://www.bursamalaysia.com/market/listed-companies/list-of-companies/main-market/ [Accessed 26 February 2017].
  12. Chartered Institute of Internal Auditors, 2015. The role of Internal Audit in non-financial and integrated reporting, l.: Chartered Institute of Internal Auditors.
  13. Cheng, M. et al., 2014. The International Integrated Reporting Framework: Key Issues and Future Research Opportunities. Journal of International Financial Management & Accounting, 25(1), pp. 90-119.
  14. Chen, Y.-P. & Perrin, S., 2017. Insights into Integrated Reporting: Challenges and best practice responses, l.: ACCA.
  15. Churet, C., RobecoSAM & Eccles, R. G., 2014. Integrated Reporting, Quality of Management, and Financial Performance. Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, 26(1), pp. 8-16.
  16. Cohen, S. & Karatzimas, S., 2015. Tracing the future of reporting in the public sector: introducing integrated popular reporting. International Journal of Public Sector Management, 28(6), pp. 449-460.
  17. DeSimone, P., 2013. Integrated Financial and Sustainability Reporting in the United States, l.: Investor Responsibility Research Center Institute and Sustainable Investments Institute.
  18. Dragu, I.-. M. & Tiron-Tudor, A., 2013. The Integrated Reporting Initiative from an Institutional Perspective: Emergent Factors. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 275-279.
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24.

Authors:

Suresh Balasingam, Dhamayanthi Arumugam, Alus Sanatova

Paper Title:

Auditors Acceptance of Dysfunctional Behaviour in Kazakhstan

Abstract: The investor confidence is essential for efficient financial markets operation around the world and it also contributes to the stability and economic growth. Therefore, investors must know that the financial information that they rely on for capital allocation decisions is reliable and credible. Consequently, the quality of audits and the quality of opinions on financial reports are crucial in this situation. And audit quality is extremely difficult to measure, what makes it sensitive towards the behaviour of individuals who carry on the audit jobs. And the aim of this study is to analyze the factors that can potentially lead to dysfunctional audit behaviour amongst auditors in Kazakhstan. And that factors consist of time budget pressure, client importance, turnover intention and personality type. The results of the study show that time budget pressure, client importance and personality type have a significant relationship with dysfunctional audit behaviour. While turnover intention has no impact on acceptance of dysfunctional audit behaviour. Thus, this study reveals the factors that may lead the auditors to behave dysfunctionally. And the results of the study give the opportunity to auditing firms to notice such behaviour and find the solutions, in order to increase the quality of audits. For the primary data collection 150 auditors from Kazakhstan will be asked to complete the questionnaire.

Keywords: Dysfunctional audit behaviour, opinions on financial reports.

References:

  1. Aamir, S. and Farooq, U. (2011). Auditor client relationship and audit Quality. Umea University, p.1-78.
  2. Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board (2010), APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants, APESB, p. 3-133.
  3. Agency of Republic of Kazakhstan on Statistics (2011). Половозрастная структура населения современного Казахстана.Экономика и статистика, p. 4-122.
  4. Alderman, C. W. andDeitrick, J. W. (1982). Auditors' perceptions of time budget pressures and premature sign-offs: A replication and extension. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory 54-68.
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  6. Amroabadi, M.S., Khanagha,J.B. and Naderibeni,M. (2014). Professional Commitment on Dysfunctional Audit Behaviour In audit organasations of Isfahan Public Accountancy. Interdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research in Business, 5(9), p.275-283.
  7. Anugerah, R., Anita,R., Sari,R.N., Abdillah, M.R. and Iskandar,T.M. (2016). The Analysis of Reduced Audit Quality Behavior: The Intervening Role of Turnover Intention. International Journal of Economics and Management, 10(2), p.341-353
  8. Aranya, N. and Ferris, K.R. (1984). A reexamination of accountants' organasational professional conflict. The Accounting Review, 59 (1), p. 1-15.
  9. Auditors’ Chamber of the Republic of Kazakhstan. (2017). CHAMBER OF AUDITORS OF THE REPUBLIC OF KAZAKHSTAN. [Online] Available from: http://www.audit.kz/. [Accessed: 1/02/2018].
  10. Bali, A. (2015). Psychological Factors Affecting Sports Performance. International Journal of Physical Education, Sports and Health, 1(6) p.92-95.
  11. Bamber, M. and Iyer, V. (2009). The effect of auditing firms’ tone at the top on auditors’ job autonomy, organasational-professional conflict, and job satisfaction. International Journal of Accounting & Information Management. 17 (2), p. 136-150.
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  16. Blay, A. D. (2005). Independence threats, litigation risk, and the auditor’s decision process. Contemporary Accounting Research. 22 (4) p. 759–789
  17. Broberg, P. (2013). The auditor at work: a study of auditor practice in big 4 audit firms. Lund University.
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25.

Authors:

Abdul Aziz Noor Ali Khan, Dhamayanthi Arumugam, Kahyahthri Suppiah

Paper Title:

The Impact of Market Risk and Fair Value Measurement on the Financial Performance of Public Corporates in Malaysia

Abstract: This research is conducted to evaluate the impact of market risk and fair value on the financial performance of public corporations in Malaysia. This is because market price conditions in the market have resulted in many significant write-offs by applying the fair value. Despite the growth seen in Malaysian companies, Market risk is still a difficult challenge that many companies fail to estimate. The study is covered during the period of 2007 and 2016. Market risk was measured by the interest rate and inflation while financial performance was measured by return on equity (ROE). The data collection method used in this research is mainly through primary and secondary data. Primary data was used to collect data on fair value, whereas secondary data was used in collection of market risk. Furthermore, researcher has also used regression analysis to study the relationships between dependent variables and independent variables. The results gathered from the findings showed that there is no relationship between market risk and financial performance of public corporations in Malaysia. Additionally, another hypothesis showed strong relationship between fair value measurement and financial performance. Moreover, researcher also suggested to include other variables such as exchange rate and financial leverage due to which the relationship with market risk could be further analyzed.

Keywords: Market risk, Fair Value, Financial Performance

References:

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  2. Andrés Navarro-Galera, M. d. C. P.-L. R.-A., 2010. Fair Value of Real Estate and Utility of Financial Statements of Construction Companies. INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE REVIEW, 13(3), pp. 323-350.
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  4. Emerson, D. J. K. K. E. &. R. R. W., 2010. Fair Value Accounting: A Historical Review of the Most Controversial Accounting Issue in Decades. Journal of Business and Economic Research , 8(4), pp. 77-86.
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  19. Ngalawa, J., 2014. Interest Rate Risk Management for Commercial Banks in Kenya. IOSR Journal of Economics and Finance , 4(1), pp. 11-21.
  20. OKOYE, D. V., 2013. EFFECT OF BANK LENDING RATE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF NIGERIAN DEPOSIT MONEY BANKS. International Journal of Business and Management Review , 1(1), pp. 34-43.
  21. Rasiah, D., 2010. heoretical framework of profitability as applied to commercial banks in Malaysia.. European Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science , Volume 19, pp. 74-97.
  22. Reza Tehrani, M. R. M. R. G., 2012. A Model for Evaluating Financial Performance of Companies by Data Envelopment Analysis. International Business Research, 5(8), pp. 8-16.
  23. Rossi, S. P. S. M. S. A. W. G., 2009. How Loan portfolio diversification affects risk, efficiency and capitalizationA managerial behaviour model for Austrian banks. Journal of Banking and Finance,, Volume 33, pp. 2218-2226.
  24. Rustam, S. B. S. Z. K. R. A., 2011. Perceptions of Corporate Customers Towards Islamic Banking Products and Services in Pakistan. The Romanian Economic Journal,, 41(1), pp. 107-123.
  25. Sayed Amin Abdellahi, A. J. M. H. H., 2017. The effect of credit risk, market risk, and liquidity risk on financial performance indicators of the listed banks on Tehran Stock Exchange. American J. Finance and Accounting, 5(1), pp. 20-30.
  26. Singh, J. P., 2015. Fair Value Accounting: A Practitioner's Perspective. IUP Journal of Accounting Research & Audit Practices, 14(2), pp. 53-65.
  27. Wambari, K. D., 2017. EFFECT OF INTEREST RATES ON THE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL BANKS IN KENYA. International Journal of Finance And Accounting, 2(4), pp. 19-35.
  28. Zabri, S. A. K. &. W. K., 2016. Corporate Governance Practices and Firm Performance: Evidence from Top 100 Public Listed Companies in Malaysia.. Procedia Economics and Finance, Volume 35, pp. 287-296.

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26.

Authors:

Lim Jia Hui, Dhamayanthi Arumugam, Suresh Balasingam

Paper Title:

The Study about Risk Assessment on Cloud Computing Security Among Small and Medium –Sized Enterprises (SMES) in Malaysia

Abstract: The primary objective of this research is to study the risk factors affecting on the cloud computing security among small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Malaysia. In this research, the researcher intends to discovery the risks on the use of cloud computing because they may affect the operating of the organisations in Malaysia. The researcher uses the primary method to conduct the data. In this research, five different variables that affect the cloud computing security significantly which include data confidentiality, data integrity, availability of data, mutual trust and auditability of data. The data was collected from the employees who use the cloud services in Malaysia. Statistical Package of the Social Sciences (SPSS) is used to assess the relationships between the five variables which able to influence the cloud security among SMEs in Malaysia. The findings discovered that all the variables have significant relationship with the cloud computing security among the SMEs in Malaysia. The conclusion have been discussed in this research that the providers and users of cloud services have responsibilities to ensure there have a safe cloud environment. This research creats the awareness of the use of cloud computing in order to avoid the risk of the data being stole or hacked and build a peace cloud environment.

Keywords: Cloud Computing Security, Data Confidentiality, Data Integrity

References:

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27.

Authors:

Thilageswary Arumugam, Amira Rahman, Mazuwin Maideen, Shamini Arumugam

Paper Title:

Examining the Effect of Transactional and Transformational Leadership Styles on Employee Satisfaction in Conglomerate Companies

Abstract: Employee satisfaction has been one of the key issues discussed in behavioural science. Many research has studied into the effective leadership approach by managers in organisation leads to organizational performance. However, leadership has an effect on employee satisfaction towards employee job performance. Employee satisfaction plays a crucial role in determining employee performance. Employee satisfaction depends upon the leadership style of managers. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between leadership styles and job satisfaction among employees in the private organisations. A cross-sectional study using web survey distributed among 377 conglomerate employees through the simple random sampling method. This study includes an analysis of two independent variable which is Transformational leadership and Transactional leadership and job satisfaction as dependant variable. The findings of the study indicate that transformational leadership and transactional leadership were significant positively correlated to employee job satisfaction. Thus, all hypothesis were accepted. This implies that employees with high job satisfaction tend to perform better with the existence of high involvement of transactional and transformational leadership. Besides, it is important that both the leadership styles are essential to employee satisfaction at job which can lead to organizational performance collectively.

Keywords: transactional leadership, transformational leadership, employee satisfaction

References:

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28.

Authors:

Suhannia Ponnusamy, Geetha A. Rubasundram

Paper Title:

An International Study on the Risk of Cyber Terrorism

Abstract: Cyberterrorism has been a risk since the advent of the Internet. Technology has developed at a rapid pace, and likewise, the risk and impact of cyberterrorism. It is pertinent that secure and updated mechanisms are in place to mitigate the risk of cyberterrorism, with international cooperation and collaboration to further enhance investigation and information gathering. This paper discusses mechanisms such as security applications, security policies, comprehending education programs, international co-operation, monitoring and Artificial Intelligence (AI) and monitoring, using and disrupting approach (M.U.D). Implementations of all the mechanisms allows computer network and systems to be less vulnerable and manages the risk of cyberterrorism because each mechanisms possess separate functions for combatting cyberterrorism. As a result, the objectives and hypothesis for this research evidences a positive correlation between the mechanisms recognized and the perceived risk of cyberterrorism. Various initiatives has been introduced by respective bodies from all over the world in order to ensure that the threat of cyberterrorism is controllable. However, the threat of cyberterrorism continuous to increase due to the constant development of Internet-based platforms. Thus, law enforcements, policies, practices and necessary measures should continue developing contemporarily to the development of computer technology.

Keywords: Cyber terrorism, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Monitoring, Using and Disrupting (M.U.D).

References:

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  19. Prasad, K. (2012).Cyber terrorism: Addressing the Challenges for Establishing an International Legal Framework. 1st ed. [ebook] Perth: Edith Cowan University. Available at: http://ro.ecu.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1016&context=act [Accessed 5 Sep. 2016].
  20. Santiago, J. (2015).Top countries best prepared against cyber attacks. [online] World Economic Forum. Available at: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2015/07/top-countries-best-prepared-against-cyberattacks/ [Accessed 24 Dec. 2016].
  21. Sjöberg, L. (2004).THE PERCEIVED RISK OF TERRORISM. [online] Available at: http://swoba.hhs.se/hastba/papers/hastba2002_011.pdf [Accessed 19 Dec. 2016].
  22. Sundaram, S. (2008).Cyber Terrorism: Problems, Perspectives, and Prescription. [online] Academia.edu. Available at: http://www.academia.edu/812094/Cyber_Terrorism_Problems_Perspectives_and_Prescription [Accessed 5 Sep. 2016].
  23. Tereshchenko, N. (2013).US Foreign Policy Challenges: Cyber Terrorism & Critical Infrastructure. [online] E-International Relations. Available at: http://www.e-ir.info/2013/06/12/us-foreign-policy- challenges-of-non-state-actors-cyber-terrorism-against-critical-infrastructure/ [Accessed 9 Sep. 2016].

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29.

Authors:

Geetha A Rubasundram

Paper Title:

Fraud Risk Assessment: A Tale of the Possible Corporate Executive Fraud and the Perceived Cyber-security

Abstract: Cyber-security is the body of technologies, processes, and practices designed to protect networks, computers, programs, and data from attack, damage, or unauthorized access. However, the dilemma arises when the attack comes from within the organization (an insider), especially from Corporate Executives with authority. Recent cases of fraud have reflected the perceived ethical environment and values as being misleading, with stakeholders being taken for a ride by Corporate Executives who often have the capability of appearing to be dynamic, charming and adding value for the organization. The Corporate Executive reflects the typical white-collar tendency: successful, reputational with everything to lose in the event of the fraud being discovered. The methodology used is Action Research, with the researcher carrying out a pro-active Fraud Risk Assessment to investigate the perceived strength of the cyber security and relevant Information Systems, especially with the risk of collaboration between the Corporate Executive, other employees and vendors.

Keywords: Corporate Executive Fraud, Cyber-security, Collaborative Fraud, Digital Evidence, Fraud Risk Assessment

References:

  1. Albrecht S, Howe K & Romney M. (1984), Deterring Fraud: The Internal Auditors Perspective, Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation
  2. Best P.J, Rikhardsson P and Toleman M. (2009), Continuous Fraud Detection in Enterprise Systems through Audit Trail Analysis, Journal of Digital Forensics, Security and Law, Vol. 4(1)
  3. Choo, F & Tan, K, (2007).An American Dream Theory of Corporate Executive Fraud, Elsevier – Accounting Forum,
  4. Clinard MB &Quinney R, (1973).Criminal Behaviour Systems, A typology, New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston
  5. Cressey, D.R (1973). Other people’s money: Montclair: Patterson Smith
  6. Dorminey J, Fleming S, Kranacher M& Riley R(2011), The Evolution of Fraud Theory. American Accounting Association Annual Meeting, Denver, August, pp.1-58
  7. Federal Evidence (2011), Authenticating Internet Screenshot Evidence under FRE 901, Federal Evidence Review
  8. Greitzer, Frank L and Frincke, Deborah A (2010), Combining Traditional Cyber Security Audit Data with Psychosocial Data : Towards Predictive Modelling for Insider Threat Mitigation. Insider Threats in Cybersecurity, New York: Springer, pp.85-114
  9. Hunker and C. W. Probst, (2011). Insiders and insider threats - an overview of definitions and mitigation techniques,” Journal of Wireless Mobile Networks, Ubiquitous Computing, and Dependable Applications (JoWUA), 2(1), pp. 4–27
  10. Karyda, Maria and Mitrou, Lilian (2007), Internet Forensics: Legal and Technical Issues DOI: 10.1109/WDFIA.2007.4299368 • Source: IEEE Xplore
  11. Kassem, R &Higson, A.W (2012), The New Fraud Triangle Model. Journal of Emerging Trends in Economics and Management Sciences, 3 (3), pp. 191-195
  12. Kelman HC & HamiltonV.L(1989), Crimes of Obedience. New Haven CT Yale University Press
  13. Kizito and Kuhne (1997), Sustaining the Benefits of Action Research In Decision Support Tools Development pp. 37-41
  14. Lori, Flynn, Carly Huth, Randy Trzeciak, Palma Buttles (2013), Best PractisesAgainst Insider Threats in All Nations, Carnegie Mellon University, Research Showcase @ CMU
  15. Newman, Zachary G and Ellis, Anthony (2011), The Reliability, Admissability and Power of Electronic Evidence, American Bar Association [online], Available at: http://apps.americanbar.org/litigation/committees/trialevidence/articles/012511-electronic-evidence.html [Accessed 5th June, 2016]
  16. Rikhardson, Pall and Kraemmergaard, Pernille (2006), Identifying the impacts of enterprise system implementation and use: Examples from Denmark, International Journal of Accounting Information Systems 7 (1), pp. 36-49
  17. Rubasundram G A (2014), Fraud Risk Assessment: A Tool for SME’s to Identify Effective Controls. Research Journal of Accounting & Finance
  18. Rubasundram G A (2015) .Perceived tone from the top during a Fraud Risk Assessment. Procedia Economics and Finance, Vol.28, pp.1-274
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  26. Zahra SA, Priem RL &Rashees AA (2005), The antecedents and consequences of top management fraud, Journal of Management

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30.

Authors:

Woodun Dhandevi, Ho Ming Kang, Raja Rajeswary Ponnusamy

Paper Title:

Lee-Carter Mortality Forecasting: Application to Mauritian Population

Abstract: Recent decades have perceived remarkable improvements in life expectancies which have further driven significant declines in mortality. The unremitting decrease in mortality rates and its systematic underestimation has been drawing the substantial attention of researchers because of its impending effect on population size and structure, social security systems and from an actuarial perspective, the life insurance and pension industry worldwide. The Lee-Carter model has been widely accepted by actuaries among all the projections methods. This paper applies the Lee-Carter model to forecast the mortality rates of Mauritius for the next 20 years. The empirical mortality data sets of the Mauritian population for the period of 1984 to 2016 obtained from the Statistics Department of Mauritius was considered. The index of the level of mortality for each gender, the shape and the sensitivity coefficients for the ages 0 to 85 were obtained using the mortality forecasting model. The Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) was used to forecast the general mortality index for the period from 2017 to 2036. The software R Programme was used to generate the next two decades forecasted death rates of the Mauritian population. The future death rates were assessed using the measures of errors such as Mean Square Error (MSE), Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and Bayesian Information Criterion (AIC). Appropriate life tables, also known as mortality tables are highly important for pricing and reserving in insurance and pension industries. The main objective of this research was to develop unabridged life tables for the Mauritian population using the projected death rates from the Lee-Carter model. With the aid of the forecasted mortality rates, mortality tables for male, female and total population were obtained from R software. Finally, the results indicate that the Lee-Carter model fitted the Mauritian mortality data reasonably well, with a percentage variation explained by Lee-Carter of 80.7%. Forecasted death rates from 2017 to 2036 had low values of MSE, AIC and BIC, showing high accuracy in the results. However, reliability tests were not conducted on the generated mortality tables, owing to time-constraint.

Keywords: Lee Carter model, SVD, life expectancies

References:

  1. Booth et al. (2008). Mortality Modelling and Forecasting: A Review of Methods. Journal of actuaries, 2(14), pp.34-56.
  2. Duolao and Pengjun (2005). Modelling and Forecasting Mortality Distributions in England and Wales Using the Lee-Carter Model. Journal of Applied Statistics, 32(9), 873-885.
  3. Hanna (2007). Applying the Lee-Carter model to countries in Easter Europe and the former SovietUnion. Journal of Applied Statistics, 33(2), pp.255-272.
  4. Lee and Carter (1992). Modelling and forecasting U.S mortality. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 87(14), 659-675.
  5. Lucia et al. (2011). The Lee-Carter Method for Estimating and Forecasting Mortality: An Application for Argentina.Journal of actuaries, 35(2), pp.34-57.
  6. Marie et al. (2010). Fitting and Forecasting Mortality Rates for Nordic Countries Using the Lee-Carter method. Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, 38(1), pp.1-20.
  7. Nuraini et al. (2016). Forecasting the Mortality Rates of Malaysian Population Using Lee-Carter Method. American Institute of Physics. 24(2), pp.43-49.
  8. Pablo (2012). Longevity risk and Private Pensions. OECD Working Papers on Insurance and Private Pensions, 3(10), pp.23-32.
  9. Pairote et al. (2016). Forecasting Thai Mortality by Using the Lee-Carter Model. Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, 10(1), pp. 231-242.
  10. Steven (2005). Lee-Carter Mortality Forecasting: Application to the Italian Population. Actuarial Research Paper No. 167, Cass Business School, City of London.
  11. Stoeldraijer et al. (2013). Impact of different mortality forecasting methods and explicit assumptions on projected future life expectancy. Demographic Research, 29(13), pp.323-354.
  12. Wasana (2014), Modelling and Forecasting Mortality in Sri Lanka. Sri Lankan Journal of Applied Statistics, 15(3), pp.60-79

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31.

Authors:

Md. Zahidul Islam, Rabeya Anzum

Paper Title:

Internet Governance: Present Situation of Bangladesh and Malaysia

Abstract: Internet is a very well-known word in this world sinceit has a revolutionary impact on our society. Nowadays we cannot think about our daily life without using internet and speciallysocial media is solely connected to it. Mass media has become more powerful in terms of spreading any news throughout the globe. With the help of social media we can attainalmost every information about the happenings of the world.At the same time, it has become very easy to create confusion among peopleby manipulating information and spreading it among people.Authorites has come forward tosuppress this kind of adversepactice of social media and imposed some regulations locallyas well as internationally. The aim of this paper is to focus on legal aspects of internet governance and the ongoing situation in terms of accessing social media in Bangladesh and Malaysia. It is qualitative research work.The information entitled in this paper has been extracted from various newspapers, articles, books and statutes. The Government of Malaysia and Bangladesh has adopted some Acts, Rules, and Regulations to avoid the malpractice of misusing Internet.

Keywords: Internet, Governance, Malaysia, Banglaesh.

References:

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32.

Authors:

Chng Leh Queen, Hafinaz Hasniyanti Hassan

Paper Title:

The Factors Affecting Malaysian Investment Risk Tolerance for Retirement Plans

Abstract: Risk tolerance is the risk levels that you able to tolerance/acceptance. It is one of the important factors for both investment managers and investors to make investment decisions. However, understanding and measuring of personal investment risk tolerance is not a simple process. Therefore, this research attempts to measure Malaysian investment risk tolerance and determine the factors that affect Malaysian investment risk tolerance for retirement plans. Besides that, the purposes of this study was to study the relationships between financial risk tolerance and factors of age, gender, education level, income level, investment goals, and investment time horizon. In the research, the data analysis will use descriptive statistics analysis, Pearson correlation coefficient, and significant test by the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). Results of Pearson correlation coefficient, and significant test indicated that age, income level and investment goals had the significant relationships with financial risk tolerance, although gender, education level and investment goals had no significant effect on financial risk tolerance.

Keywords: Risk tolerance, Investment goals, Investment time horizon, Retirement plans

References:

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33.

Authors:

Yong Xian Jeat, Hafinaz Hasniyanti Hassan

Paper Title:

The Impact of Economic Outlook on the Stock Market of the Service Sector in Malaysia

Abstract: This research is focus on the impact of the economic factors on the service sector’s stock market in Malaysia for the period of year 2012 to year 2016 which are five years. In the year 2014, the value of the Malaysian Ringgit (MYR) was starting to decrease dramatically as well as other factors affected by the exchange rate of Malaysia currency such as interest rate and money supply. Therefore, this research seeks to find out on the effect of the exchange rate, interest rate and money supply on the stock market of the service and trading companies (service sectors). The relationship between the service sector’s stock market and the exchange rate, interest rate and money supply are determined by using the correlation and multiple regressions analysis. Overall, the results showed that the stock market of the service sectors in Malaysia would likely to be affected by the exchange rate, money supply and interest rate, yet the most influence factor was the exchange rate as the Malaysian Ringgit is decreased in value, sending the panic to the market.

Keywords: Stock market, exchange rate, interest rate, money supply, service sector

References:

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34.

Authors:

Yap Li Xian, Hafinaz Hasniyanti Hassan

Paper Title:

Awareness of Unit Trust among Young Professionals in Malaysian Private Sector

Abstract: Unit trust is one of the alternative investments available in the market. It is suitable for young workers due to its features of lower initial capital and assisted by professional expertise to manage the investments. However, statistics showed that unit trust has lower amount invested compared to other type of investments. Hence, this study seeks to investigate the awareness of unit trust among young professionals in Malaysia. The relationship between demographic factors (gender, income and occupations), tax benefits and diversification towards the awareness of unit trust in Malaysia were tested.The data was collected from 105 respondents in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia by conducting questionnaires. The data analysis techniques used are descriptive analysis, reliability test, regression analysis and correlation coefficient. The result showed that income and occupation have significant relationship towards the awareness of unit trust while gender, tax benefit and diversification of portfolio have been found to be insignificant towards the awareness of unit trust.

Keywords: Unit trust, young professionals, private sector, diversification, investment

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35.

Authors:

Bhagmal Harsya Neelanjana, Hafinaz Hasniyanti Hassan

Paper Title:

The Impact of Dividend Policy on the Volatility of Share Price of Manufacturing Companies in Malaysia

Abstract: The objective of this research is to investigate the relationship between dividend policy and share price volatility of manufacturing companies in Malaysia. For this purpose, A sample of 35 dividend and non-dividend paying listed companies in the Malaysian Stock Exchange is taken from the food, beverages, chemical, home product and consumer product manufacturing sector for the time period starting 2008 to 2017. Dividend payout, dividend yield are the main independent variables while firm size and earnings volatility are the control variables that are tested against the volatility of share price in this study. The Pearson Correlation Analysis and Multiple Linear Regression are used for analysis to examine the relationship between the independent variables and share price volatility. Financial data was collected from annual reports of the companies listed in Bursa Malaysia. Results showed that dividend payout, firm size and earning volatility had a significant negative relationship with share price volatility while dividend was found to be insignificant to share price volatility.

Keywords: Dividend policy, share price, volatility, manufacturing company

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36.

Authors:

Rifqah Amaliah S, Hafinaz Hasniyanti Hassan

Paper Title:

The Relationship between Bank’s Credit Risk, Liquidity, and Capital Adequacy towards its Profitability in Indonesia

Abstract: The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between bank’s credit risk, liquidity, and capital adequacy towards its profitability in Indonesia. The main indicators used in this research are Net Interest Margin, Return on Asset, Non-Performing Loan Ratio, Loan to Deposit Ratio, and Capital Adequacy Ratio. This research uses the data from publicly annual report of four state-owned banks in Indonesia during 10 years period (2007 to 2016). The data analysis is conducted by finding the significant relation and the degree to which the relation exists among variables. The result of the research shows that there is a significant relationship between dependent variable (NIM, ROA) and overall independent variables (NPLR, LDR, CAR) yet in a negative correlation.

Keywords: profitability, credit risk, liquidity, and capital adequacy.

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Authors:

Choy Veng Yieand, Ng Hui Chen

Paper Title:

Determinants of Bond Yield

Abstract: In Malaysia, the fixed income market has outperformed the growth of equity market. Numerically, fixed income market has grew RM 0.42 trillion from year 2010 to RM 1.17 trillion in 2016 whereas the equity market has a growth of RM 0.39 trillion from RM 1.28 trillion to RM 1.67 trillion (Capital Market Malaysia, 2015). Notably, Malaysia’s fixed income market has even succeeded to become the third largest bond market in Asia in 2015. This paper is conducted in order to identify the determinants of Malaysian government bond yield. Few tests are employed, including the descriptive analysis, normality test, unit root test and the Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) model to test on data range from 2006(Q1) to 2016(Q4). The findings indicated that all the explanatory variables, namely exchange rate, foreign interest rate and GDP growth rate are significant in explaining the variation in Malaysian government bond yield except the current account balance to GDP ratio.

Keywords: Malaysian government bond yield; exchange rate; foreign interest rate; GDP, current account balance to GDP ratio

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38.

Authors:

Lim Jin Xong, Ho Ming Kang

Paper Title:

A Comparison of Classification Models for Life Insurance Lapse Risk

Abstract: Insurer usually incurs expenses such as policy issuance cost, commission and administrative costs after the launching of an insurance product. When a policyholder decided to lapse a policy, the insurer have to seek for alternative to cover all the losses, which might liquidate high-yielding investments in order to satisfy their requests for the cash value or surrender value. Therefore, it is crucial to understand and develop a classification model to determine the surrender or lapse risk. In this study, four classification models such as logistic regression, k-Nearest Neighbor, Neural Network (NN) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used to model the life insurance lapse risk, which is the risk thatinvolving the termination of policies by the policyholders. Classification performance criterions such as prediction accuracy and area under the Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) are used to compare the performance between the models. The results showed that SVMwas outperformed than NN, logistic regression and k- Nearest Neighbor.

Keywords: Logistic Regression, k-Nearest Neighbor, Neural Network, Support Vector Machines, Classification, Lapse Risk.

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39.

Authors:

Mazliana Mustapa, Raja Rajeswari Ponnusamy, Ho Ming Kang

Paper Title:

Forecasting Prices of Fish and Vegetable using Web Scraped Price Micro Data

Abstract: In Malaysia, price statistics that are used as a proxy for inflation is the Consumer Price Index (CPI). The web scraped data has the possibility to become new source of compiling the CPI. The benefits using the web scraped data is can get the price information on a daily basis as compared to traditional data collection which takes on weekly or monthly basis. Price movement of the web scraped data can be monitored in real time and can benefits to policy makers. Forecasting price using the web scraped data helps the official statistics office to predict future value and can be used to control the situation of supply and demand side. Forecasting using web scraped data allow the policy makers to make the quick and right decision at the right time. Numerous studies have been conducted by the other National Statistics Office regarding the web scraped data, however studies on forecasting using web scraped is deficient. Thus, this study aims to utilize the web scraped data in forecasting ten selected fish and vegetables in Malaysia using Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) approach. The main objective of this study is to explore and evaluate the dependability of the alternative online data prices to forecast using ARIMA approach. The outcome of this research wills benefits to the Department of Statistics, Malaysia (DOSM). The forecasting model will be used to forecast price in the CPI compilation. This information offers better estimation and more timely. The modernization of the data collection by using the web scraped data will helps to reduce the burden of the establishments/supermarkets/wet markets. The coverage of CPI will be extended and will produce good quality statistics. The forecasting using web scraped data will improve understanding or perception of price behavior. Price forecasting will be an input to the policy makers when the price is increasing.

Keywords: Consumer Price Index, Web scraped data, Forecasting, ARIMA

References:

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40.

Authors:

Saud Al Zadjali, Sumaira Muhammad Hayat Khan

Paper Title:

Application of Sign Language in Designing Restaurant’s Menu for Deaf People

Abstract: The food ordering applications are depending on the normal menu having no interaction between the customer and staff. This is because all meals are shown either by name as a text or by a picture added to the text. Normal people who can listen and talk will be able to explain their special request by talking to the restaurant staff but, what if the customer is deaf and can’t talk or listen? In such a case, it requires the staff to be trained to use the sign language or to find a translator, otherwise the customer(deaf) will not be able to interact with the staff unless he / she knows the meal and tried it before and suits his / her favourites. The author in this research is looking forward to upgrading the food ordering menu by proposing an interactive computerized menu supporting sign language and English language. Thus, facilitating restaurants with an application which allows better interaction between deaf people and the way of ordering system.

Keywords: sign language, deaf people

References:

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41.

Authors:

Vam Lock Kwan, Rahilah Ahmad, Rohizan Ahmad

Paper Title:

Cosmetic Advertisements: A Study on Self-Esteem and Buying Behaviour of Young Women in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Abstract: The current trend among young women in this millennium era desire to have their looks as per their idols portrayed in the cosmetic advertisements. Young women play an important role in the market as they exert enormous influence over the spending power across a growing number of product categories including cosmetics. According to Scott (2007), beauty industry tends to reveal unrealistic beauty standards in cosmetic advertisements which some may lead to negative effects on young women such as feeling inadequate of self-esteem and lack of self-confidence. As a result of this negative effect of personal beauty evaluation, this study is conducted to investigate the impact of cosmetic advertisements on self-esteem and buying behaviour among young women in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A primary research has been conducted via online data collection towards 216 young women in Kuala Lumpur. The findings indicated that there is a significance correlation between cosmetic advertisements, self-esteem, and buying behavior. Finally, this research is expected to benefit the young women to be cautious in believing the advertisements provided by cosmetic producers’ in-lieu with their intention to be beautiful as portrayed by the advertisers.

Keywords: cosmetic advertisement, self-esteem, buying behaviour, young women.

References:

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42.

Authors:

Joanne Sequerah, Jugindar Singh Kartar Singh

Paper Title:

The Influence of Work-Life Balance, Perceived Flexibility and Maternity Benefits Towards the Retention of Working Mothers in Kuala Lumpur

Abstract: The present study examined the influence of work-life balance, perceived flexibility and maternity benefits towards the retention of working mothers. This was a quantitative research and using a survey method. Data was collected from a sample of 112 working mothers using a self- administered questionnaire. The AMOS software developed for analyzing the Structure Equation Modeling (SEM) and SPSS was used. The findings revealed that women who perceived their organizations offered flexible work hours reported higher levels to remain with the organization. The findings revealed that maternity benefits have a significant impact towards retention. However, the results revealed that work-life balance had an insignificant relationship towards the retention of working mothers. The findings supported the results from some earlier studies and bring out several new ideas such as the importance of offering flexible working hours. The findings have significantly contributed to the advancement of knowledge in the retention of working mothers. As for practical implication, the significant and positive impact of flexibility and maternity benefits suggests the importance of these factors in retention of working mothers. It is recommended that organizations implement policies to support flexible working hours and provide maternity benefits. The paper's primary contribution is finding that flexible working hours and maternity benefits have a significant impact on retention of working mothers.

Keywords: Work-life Balance, Maternity benefits, Job retention, flexibility, working mothers. The results of this study will add to the current body of knowledge as well as assist in creating foundational solutions to ensure successful retention of working mothers.

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Authors:

Ainur Shaimerdenova, Jugindar Singh Kartar Singh, Subaashnii Suppramaniam

Paper Title:

Growth Opportunity, Supportive Management, Meaningful Work and Turnover Intention among Generation Y Employees: A quantitative Study in the Public Sector in Astana, Kazakhstan

Abstract: Kazakhstan’s public sector has changed rapidly since the country gained independence and in 2016 there were 90,730 employees in this sector. The present study examined the influence of growth opportunity, supportive management and meaningful work towards turnover intention among Generation Y Employees in the Public Sector in Astana, Kazakhstan. This was a quantitative research that used a survey method. Data was collected from a sample of 211 Gen Y employees in the public sector in Astana, Kazakhstan. The findings revealed that meaningful work and supportive management had a significant impact on turnover intention. However, the results revealed that growth opportunity had an insignificant relationship towards the turnover intention. The findings supported the results from some earlier studies and bring out several new ideas such as the importance of supportive management. The findings have significantly contributed to the advancement of knowledge in the turnover intention of public sector employees. As for practical implication, the significant and positive impact of supportive management and meaningful work suggests the importance of these factors in retention of Gen Y employees. It is recommended that organizations implement policies to support meaningful work and supportive management policies and practices. The results of this study will add to the current body of knowledge. The paper's primary contribution is that it provides an understanding that supportive management and meaningful work have an impact on reducing the turnover intention of Gen Y employees in Astana, Kazakhstan.

Keywords: Growth Opportunity, Supportive Management, Meaningful Work, Turnover Intention

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Authors:

Tejash Roy Chunnoo, Ng Hui Chen

Paper Title:

Customer Loyalty and its determinants: A study on Foreign Banks in Malaysia

Abstract: Given the changes and advancements in the current financial landscape, the loyalty of foreign banks’ customers has been on the loose ends latterly, with most individuals having a greater inclination towards local banks. Customer loyalty plays an important role on the income streams of banks and for their own survival in today’s competition oriented-environment. This study seeks to examine the factors affecting customer loyalty towards the customers of foreign banks in Malaysia. It investigates the effect of corporate image, trust, switching costs and service quality on customer loyalty by employing models such as SERVQUAL and Dick and Basu model. Through a random sampling technique, data were collected using structured questionnaires from a total of 150 individuals holding a banking account with at least one of the foreign banks operating on the Malaysian shores. The results indicate that three out of the four variables tested, i.e. service quality, corporate image and switching costs, are the main factors most likely to influence customer loyalty of foreign banking customers. The findings further prove that trust did not radiate any effect on customer loyalty. This study also holds some recommendations on how foreign banks can reverse their current situation and have a better approach at retaining their customers.

Keywords: customer loyalty, SERVQUAL model, Dick and Basu model, foreign banks

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  29. Yacob, Y. (2016). (PDF) Service Quality Dimensions and Members’ Satisfaction: A Mixed-Methods Approach.
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45.

Authors:

Anusuiya Subramaniam, Li Sha

Paper Title:

Influence of Psychological Contract, Organisational Justice and Organisational Commitment Among Dispatched Employees’ Turnover Intention: Evidence from Chinese MNCs

Abstract: Labour dispatching is emerging as flexible and effective employment model in the labour system, where it plays an effective role in reducing the labour costs. Nevertheless, research among dispatched employees are scarce. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify the following: (1) relationship between psychological contract and turnover intention, (2) relationship between organisational justice and turnover intention and (3) organisational commitment and turnover intention among dispatched employees attached to Multinational Corporations in China. This study will look in depth on how these factors will affect the dispatched employees’ turnover intention. A questionnaire-based survey was carried out among dispatched employee in Multinational Corporations in China. Purposive sampling was utilized. The survey yielded 213 responses. The results were analysed using SPSS 22.0. Findings of this study revealed the following: (1) when dispatched employees begin to realize that employers cannot meet the expectations of the contract and identify occurrence of betrayal, dispatched employees will have higher intention to move out of the organisation, (2) unfair work environment generates tension within an individual, which may eventually result in a reduction on dispatched employees’ belonging towards the organisation and (3) dispatched employees who are more committed to the organisation are less inclined to leave. In conclusion, the influencing mechanism of dispatched employees’ turnover intention were identified through this study.

Keywords: Psychological Contract, Organisational Justice, Organisational Commitment, China

References:

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46.

Authors:

Nurdaulet Nurysh, Navaz Naghavi, Benjamin Chan Yin Fah

Paper Title:

Study on Factors Affecting Customer Satisfaction in Mobile Telecommunication Industry in Malaysia

Abstract: The wireless telecommunication industry in Malaysia demonstrates evident signs of a consistently changes in industry paradigm and signs of moving market. Since the rapid growth of wireless technologies and high demand of consumers for more advanced wireless services, the standard of wireless telecommunication services is moving from voice-centered communication to a series of the high-speed data communication and multimedia. This study is an acknowledgement to the request by previous researchers on the need to examine the important factors such as perceived value and service quality that can directly affect the customer satisfaction in Malaysian mobile phone operator. The moderating effect of attractiveness of alternatives has been also tested between variables. Therefore, the empirical findings, which are based on quantitative research and further multiple regression analysis, shows that both perceived value and service quality has positive relationship towards customer satisfaction. But, the moderator was found that the interaction of both variables with Attractiveness of alternatives has no effect to improve or enhance the satisfaction.

Keywords: Customer Satisfaction, Service Quality, Perceived Value, Attractiveness of Alternatives, multiple regression analysis.

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47.

Authors:

Subaashnii Suppramaniam, Patrick Han Kok Siew, Gainedenova Ainara

Paper Title:

An Employability Assessment of Fresh Business Graduates in Kuala Lumpur from the Perspective of Employers

Abstract: This research paper attempts to investigate the graduate labor market from an employer-oriented perspective. This is analyzed in line with the perceptions from various Business Enterprises in Malaysia who are the possible employers of these graduates. A survey is attempted via the distribution of a questionnaire to the Small, Large and Medium Business Enterprises in Kuala Lumpur. The analysis is bound to show the relationship between the Employability Skills of Fresh Business Graduates and satisfaction of employers with said skills. The objectives of this paper were: (i) To identify the Employability skills gap present among Fresh Business Graduates and Employer Perspectives in Kuala Lumpur; (ii) To identify the current employers' satisfaction and dissatisfaction with the skills of the existing graduate employees. This would possibly give chances for academicians to judge the existing degree curriculum and recognize the identifiable needs of the Malaysian employers and to be able to respond and cater to the market needs.

Keywords: Employability, Skills

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48.

Authors:

Subaashnii Suppramaniam, Janitha Kularajasingam, Nusrath Sharmin

Paper Title:

Factors Influencing Parents Decision in Selecting Private Schools in Chittagong City, Bangladesh

Abstract: The purpose of this research is to examine the factors influencing the parents’ decision in selecting private schools in Chittagong city, Bangladesh. The factors are school popularity, school quality, future option, parents’ income level and parents’ educational level. There has been many researches on parents’ involvement on school selection and related factors which influence them to select private schools. The current study conducted in the port city of Bangladesh as it is not possible to cover the whole country with 3 months. This is conclusive research used quantitative approaches. 150 questionnaires have been send to the parents of 4 private school students through online survey and 110 responded. The results were analyzed through SPSS using correlation and multiple regression to find the answers for the hypothesis. In the results, it showed that school popularity, school quality, future option and parents’ income level have a relationship with private school selection but parents’ educational level doesn’t have a relationship with private school selection in Chittagong city. The factors influence parents’ decisions are school quality, future option, parents’ income level, but school popularity and parents’ educational level doesn’t influence parents’ decision in selecting private schools in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

Keywords: School Choice, Private School, parents Decision

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49.

Authors:

Hazlina Darman, Sarah Musa, Rajasegeran Ramasamy, Raja Rajeswari

Paper Title:

Predicting Students’ Final Grade in Mathematics Module using Multiple Linear Regression

Abstract: Learning analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs. In this paper, multiple linear regression model is developed to predict the students’ score in Final Exam using their assessments’ score. The response variable in this model is the students’ score in Final Exam and the predictor variables are the assessment components (Test 1 and Test 2). The data were collected from a group of students in School of Actuarial Science, Mathematics, and Qualitative Study (SOMAQS), Asia Pacific University of Technology and Innovation (APU), Malaysia. In this research, a regression model has been developed with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) analysis tool. The graphical representations and tables are presented to illustrate the models.

Keywords: Multiple Linear Regression, Students’ Performance, Learning Analytics, SPSS, Response, Variable, Predictor Variable, Correlation

References:

  1. Adeyemi, T.O., (2008) ‘Predicting Students’ Performance in Senior Secondary Certificate Examination from Performance in Junior Secondary Certificate Examinations in Ondo State, Nigeria’, Humanity & Social Sciences Journal 3(1), pp. 26-36.
  2. Adhatrao, K., Gaykar, A., Dhawan, A, Jha, R. and Honrao, V. (2013) ‘Predicting Students’ Performance Using ID3 and C4.5 Classification Algorithms’, Computers and Society, Cornell University Library.
  3. Ayan, M. N. R and Garcia, M. T. C. (2008) ‘Prediction of University Students’ Academic Achievement by Linear and Logistic models’, The Spanish Journal of Psychology 11, pp. 275-288.
  4. Green, S. I. (2005) ‘Student Assessment Precision in Mechanical Engineering Courses’, Journal of Engineering Education 94, pp. 273-278.
  5. Huang, S and Fang, N. (2010) ‘Regression Models for Predicting Student Academic Performance In an Engineering Dynamics Course’, American Society for Engineering Education.
  6. Ibrahim, Z. and Rusli, D. (2007) ‘Predicting Students’ Academic Performance: Comparing Artificial Neural Network, Decision Tree and Linear Regression’, 21st Annual SAS Malaysia Forum, Kuala Lumpur.
  7. Imbrie, P. K., Lin, J.J., Reid, K., and Malyscheff, A. (2008) ‘Using Hybrid Data to Model Student Success in Engineering with Artificial Neural Networks’, Proceedings of the Research in Engineering Education Symposium, Davos, Switzerland.
  8. Karamazova, E., Zenku, T. J., and Trifunov, Z. (2017) ‘Analysing and Comparing the Final Grade in Mathematics by Linear Regression Using Excel and SPSS’, International of Mathematics Trend and Technology (IJMTT), 52 (5), pp. 334-344.
  9. Khan, W. S and Al-Zubaidy, S. (2017) ‘Prediction of Student Performance in Academic and Military Learning Environment: Use of Multiple Linear Regression and Predictive Model and Hypothesis Testing’, International Journal of Higher Education, 6 (4), pp. 152-160.
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  12. Nghe, N. T., Janecek, P., and Haddawy, P. (2007) ‘A Comparative Analysis of Techniques for Predicting Academic Performance’, Proceedings of the 37thASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conferences, Milwaukee, WI.
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50.

Authors:

Ally Faraj Abri, Dhamayanthi Arumugam, Suresh Balasingam

Paper Title:

Impact of the Corporate Governance on the Financial Statement Fraud: A Study Focused on Companies in Tanzania

Abstract: In the previous couple of years, the attention of the public has been increasing rapidly towards big corporations and their disclosures of accounting frauds and false reporting as well as high amounts of compensations given to the executives and mismanagement leading to bankruptcy faced by the large corporations. The accounting frauds and poor corporate governance system have been reported in many countries including Tanzania, USA, and Canada etc. The scandals committed by large companies in Tanzania was brought to public attention when it began around 2005 which led to loss of millions of dollars. These scandals were such as External payment arrears known as EPA and the scandal of Escrow. Corporate governance system has a major impact on the financial statements and accounting fraud in the company. Good corporate governance means that the financial statements reported to the public will be free from errors and accounting frauds will be minimized. The general objective of this research is to analyze the impacts of corporate governance system on the financial statement frauds particularly with companies in Tanzania. The design and approach of this study is chosen as a quantitative research which incorporates primary data. The primary data of this research will includes questionnaires given to stakeholders of companies in Tanzania. The results indicate that Audit committee effectiveness, tone at the top level management, Independence of BOD and Audit committee, policies and ethical guidance and corporate culture has a direct impact on the financial statement fraud. Future researchers may also include other areas of corporate governance in which they can include other variables such as Board meeting and board size should be included in relating to how it affects the overall quality of financial reports and the financial statementfraud.

Keywords: Corporate governance, financial statement fraud, Tanzania

References:

  1. Khan, H. (2011). A Literature Review of Corporate Governance. International Conference on E- business, Management and Economics, [online] 25. Available at: http://www.ipedr.com/vol25/1- ICEME2011-A10015.pdf.
  2. Nahar Abdullah, S., Zalina Mohamad Yusof, N. and Naimi Mohamad Nor, M. (2010). Financial restatements and corporate governance among Malaysian listed companies. Managerial Auditing Journal, 25(6), pp.526-552.
  3. Agyei-Mensah, B. (2017). The relationship between corporate governance, corruptionand forward-looking information disclosure: a comparative study. Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, 17(2), pp.284-304
  4. Alleyne, P., Weekes-Marshall, D. and Broome, T. (2014). Accountants’ perceptions of corporate governance in public limited liability companies in an emerging economy. Meditari Accountancy Research, 22(2), pp.186-210.
  5. Crawford, R. and Weirich, T. (2011). Fraud guidance for corporate counsel reviewing financial statements and reports. Journal of Financial Crime, 18(4), pp.347-360.
  6. Law, P. (2011). Corporate governance and no fraud occurrence in organizations. Managerial Auditing Journal, 26(6), pp.501-518.
  7. Lokanan, M. (2014). How senior managers perpetuate accounting fraud? Lessons for fraud examiners from an instructional case. Journal of Financial Crime, 21(4), pp.411-423.
  8. Romano, G. and Guerrini, A. (2012). Corporate governance and accounting enforcement actions in Italy. Managerial Auditing Journal, 27(7), pp.622-638.
  9. Omar, N., Johari, Z. and Hasnan, S. (2015). Corporate Culture and the Occurrence of Financial Statement Fraud: A Review of Literature. Procedia Economics and Finance, [online] 31, pp.367-372.
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  12. Crawford, R. and Weirich, T. (2011). Fraud guidance for corporate counsel reviewing financial statements and reports. Journal of Financial Crime, [online] 18(4), pp.347-360.
  13. Unwin, A. (2013). Discovering Statistics Using R by Andy Field, Jeremy Miles, Zoë Field. International Statistical Review, [online] 81(1), pp.169-170.
  14. Arel, B., Beaudoin, C. and Cianci, A. (2011). The Impact of Ethical Leadership and theInternal Audit Function on Financial Reporting Decisions. SSRN Electronic Journal. [online]
  15. Crawford, R. and Weirich, T. (2011). Fraud guidance for corporate counsel reviewing financial statements and reports. Journal of Financial Crime, [online] 18(4), pp.347-360.
  16. Harjoto, M. (2017). Corporate social responsibility and corporate fraud. Social Responsibility Journal, [online] 13(4), pp.762-779.
  17. Ugrin, J. and Odom, M. (2010). Exploring Sarbanes–Oxley’s effect on attitudes, perceptions of norms, and intentions to commit financial statement fraud from a general deterrence perspective. Journal of Accounting and Public Policy, [online] 29(5), pp.439-458.

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51.

Authors:

Raja Rajeswari Ponnusamy

Paper Title:

The Performance of Response Surface Methodology Based on the OLS and MM-Estimators for Second-Order Regression Model

Abstract: Response surface methodology (RSM) is a set of statistical and mathematical techniques useful for developing, improving, and optimizing processes. RSM studies the relationship between responses and a set of input variables. The discussion in the study covers the use of second-order model to approximate this relationship. Analytical method and graphical method are the procedures used in solving a RSM problem. The study also presents the setting of central composite design (CCD) especially Central Composite Face Centred (CCF) in fitting a second-order model. This study proposed RSM using OLS and the MM-estimators to obtain the fitted regression models. The purpose here is to compare the performance of RSM based on OLS and robust MM-estimators in the second-order regression model. The same procedure applied to the contaminated dataset in order to find a robust regression estimator. A regression estimator is said to be robust if it is still reliable in the presence of outlier. The improvements relative to the MM method is illustrated by means of the parameter estimates for small, medium and large sample bias calculations, standard errors (SE), and root mean square errors (RMSE). A real data example analysis and simulations were employed in this study. It turns out that the performance of RSM based on MM-estimator is more efficient than the OLS-estimator in the absence of outliers for the real data analysis. Consequently, these results supported with the simulation analysis.

Keywords: Response surface methodology, MM-estimators, Robust regression estimator

References:

  1. Dean, A. and Voss, D. (2017). Design and Analysis of Experiments. 2nd Springer.
  2. Kutner, M.H., Nachtsheim, C.J., Neter, N., and William, U. (2013). Applied Linear Regression Models.5th McGraw-Hill.
  3. Maroona, R., Martin, D., and Yohai, V. (2006). Robust Statistics: Theory and Methods. John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
  4. Myer R.H., and Montgomery D.C. (2016). Response Surface Methodology: Process and Product Optimization Using Designed Experiments. 4th Canada: John Wiley and Sons.
  5. Psomas, S.K., Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, M. and Kyriakidis, D.A. (2007). Optimization Study of Xanthan Gum Production Using Response Surface Methodology. Biochemical Engineering Journal. Vol.35. 273-280.
  6. Rousseeuw, R. J. and Leroy, A. M. (2003). Robust Regression and Outlier Detection. New York: Wiley and Sons, Inc..

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52.

Authors:

Ripin Lamat, Shazali Johari, Puvaneswaran Kunasekaran

Paper Title:

Factors Influencing Sustainable Community based Tourism (CBT) among the Indigenous People of Lambir, Sarawak

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of community as an important player for community-based tourism in rural areas. Although government’s initiatives are evident, the sustainability of the development is questionable. In this paper, attributes from previous research of local communities’ attitude were reviewed and linked to construct a model within the scope of community tourism. This study is deductive in nature where descriptive statistics used to measure the relevant dimensions. As a result, two themes were measured to have significant contribution in determining local community’s perception on community tourism. This finding can be used in determining sustainable tourism practice which will be focused on participationand empowerment aspects.

Keywords: community tourism, perception, sustainability

References:

  1. Cooper, C., Fletcher, J., Fyall, A., Gilbert, D., & Wanhill, S. (2000). Turismo: princípios e prática. Bookman.
  2. Croes, R. R. (2006). A paradigm shift to a new strategy for small island economies: Embracing demand side economics for value enhancement and long term economic stability. Tourism Management, 27(3), 453-465.
  3. Ibrahim, Y. (2008). Pembangunan pelancongan dan perubahan komuniti. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka.
  4. Ibrahim, Y., & Razzaq, A. R. A. (2010). Homestay program and rural community development in Malaysia. Journal of Ritsumeikan Social Sciences and Humanities, 2, 7-24.
  5. Ismail, (2010). Program homestay dan kesannya keatas pembangunan komuniti desa di Negeri Selangor. Tesis Ijazah Doktor Falsafah. Universiti Putra Malaysia. Serdang, Selangor.
  6. Kayat, K. (2002). Exploring factors influencing individual participation in community‐based tourism: The case of Kampung relau homestay program, Malaysia. Asia Pacific Journal of Tourism Research, 7(2), 19-27.
  7. Kunasekaran, P., S. S. Gill, A. T. Talib, & M. R. Redzuan (2013). Culture As An Indigenous Tourism Product Of Mah Meri Community In Malaysia. Life Science Journal, 10(3).
  8. Kunasekaran, P., S. S. Gill, and A. T. Talib (2015). Community Resources as the Indigenous Tourism Product of the Mah Meri People in Malaysia. Journal of Sustainable Development. Vol. 8, No. ( 6), 78-87
  9. Kunasekaran, P., S. S. Gill, and R. Ma'rof (2013). Indigenous
    tourism as a poverty eradication tool of Orang Asli in Malaysia. Journal of Culture and Tourism Research, 15 (1), 95-102.
  10. Kunasekaran, P., S. Ramachandran, M. R. Yacob, & A. Shuib (2011). Development of farmers’ perception scale on agro tourism in Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. World Applied Sciences Journal, 12(Special Issue of Tourism & Hospitality), 10–18.

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53.

Authors:

Shazali Johari, Puvaneswaran Kunasekaran

Paper Title:

Bidayuh community’s Social Capital Development towards Sustainable Indigenous Tourism in Sarawak, Malaysia

Abstract: The aim of this study is to holistically understand the role of social capital and resources in influencing the sustainable indigenous tourism practice of the Bidayuh indigenous community in Malaysia. Lack of specific study on Bidayuh community and tourism participation has created a significant justification for this study as they are the main stakeholders of the rural setting. This study employs a quantitative approach for data elicitation and analysis. Pearson correlation is used as the statistical analysis to measure the relationship of linking, bridging and bonding of the community towards sustainable tourism practice. Overall, the social capital variables had average and strong relationship with the sustainable indigenous tourism dimensions. The community believe that tourism is a dominant tool to develop social capital. However, they are still dependent on the support of outsiders to develop the social capital.

Keywords: Indigenous tourism, social capital, Sarawak

References:

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  4. Butler, R. and T. Hinch, , 2007. Tourism and indigenous people: issues and implications, 2nd edition, Michigan: Butterworth-Heinemann (first published: 1996).
  5. Besermenji, S., N. Milić, , & I. Mulec, 2011. Indians culture in the tourism of Ontario. Zbornik radova Geografskog instituta" Jovan Cvijić", SANU, 61(3), 119-136.
  6. Kunasekaran, P., S. S. Gill, A. T. Talib, & M. R. Redzuan, 2013. Culture As An Indigenous Tourism Product Of Mah Meri Community In Malaysia. Life Science Journal, 10(3).
  7. Kunasekaran, P., S. S. Gill, and A. T. Talib, 2015. Community Resources as the Indigenous Tourism Product of the Mah Meri People in Malaysia. Journal of Sustainable Development. Vol. 8, No.(6), 78-87
  8. Kunasekaran, P., S. S. Gill, and R. Ma'rof, 2013.Indigenous
    tourism as a poverty eradication tool of Orang Asli in Malaysia. Journal of Culture and Tourism Research, 15 (1), 95-102.
  9. Kunasekaran, P., S. Ramachandran, M. R. Yacob, & A. Shuib 2011. Development of farmers’ perception scale on agro tourism in Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. World Applied Sciences Journal, 12(Special Issue of Tourism & Hospitality), 10–18.

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54.

Authors:

Shideh Ziaee Boroujeni, Mudiarasan Kuppusamy

Paper Title:

The Nexus between Emotional Intelligence and Communication Apprehension amongst Millennial in Malaysia

Abstract: The two concepts of emotional intelligence (EI) and communication apprehension (CA) have been studied extensively in separate contexts and to some extent in connection with each other, but the components of EI have never been studied in relation to CA. This dissertation aims to illuminate whether EI and each of its four components (the skills of perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions) are negatively related to CA. Past literature indicates that CA, a handicap that harms some people in the society, has a negative impact on personal, professional and academic success and that EI is a skill that can be mastered; hence, the most important contribution of this study is that CA can be overcome or alleviated. The underpinning theories of the research are Theory of Communication Apprehension, Theory of Multiple Intelligences, Social Intelligence Theory and Theory of Emotions. Data for this quantitative study has been collected from over 400 undergraduate university students via a survey containing tests on CA and EI and processed via SPSS. Findings from the research suggest there is an inverse relationship between EI and CA and all the five hypotheses are accepted. However, to ensure generalizability of the results so as to implement new educational policies on EI and CA awareness among Millennials, diverse populations, different locations and more variables need to be tested applying more specific sampling methods.

Keywords: Communication apprehension, Emotional intelligence, Millennials

References:

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  2. Two studies concerning the predictive validity of the personal report of communication apprehension in employment interviews. Communication Research Reports, 12(2), 145-151.
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55.

Authors:

Ariful Islam, Mazuwin Binti Haja Maideen, Abdul Rashid Bin Abdullah

Paper Title:

The Role of Employee Knowledge and Behavior towards Sustainable Development: An Investigative Study Based on Readymade Garments Industry of Chittagong, Bangladesh

Abstract: The sustainable development topic of readymade garments sector speaks to a flawed picture considering distinctive sustainable issues as ecological impressions, workplace or factory security and labor rights. Therefore, sustainable point of view mostly in the readymade garments industry has distinguished as a noteworthy subject because of upsurge responsiveness related with ecological and social impacts of concern industry mainly at developing countries such as Bangladesh. In fact the present authoritative culture of focused industry is kind of dynamic and complex where the complicacy of employee behavior and concerns connected with sustainable development issues that may deliver misconception in regards to how to approach employee contribution plans towards sustainable goals. Therefore the objective of present research is to recognize the level as well as the impact and relationship among employee knowledge and behavior of sustainable development in Chittagong, Bangladesh. The study has consumed mixed method approaches considering participants from BGMEA enlisted industries of Chittagong. The obtained outputs show that reflected participants hold moderate level of knowledge and behavior towards sustainable issues. It has also been identified that knowledge has significant impact on behavioral pattern of employees and both variables contain a positive connection. The acquired insights may encourage both employee and concern management to find the basic elements to start efficient association towards sustainable development practices.

Keywords: BGMEA, International buyer, Strategy, Sustainable development.

References:

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56.

Authors:

Darshini Veerasundar, Mazuwin Binti Haja Maideen

Paper Title:

The Impact of Leadership Styles, Perception towards Gender and Working Experience on Employees’ Job Satisfaction in the Higher Education Institute

Abstract: The main objective of this study is to examine the relationship between leadership styles; perception towards gender; working experience and employees job satisfaction in the Higher Education Institute in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Questionnaires were used as the data collecting method. The sample size compromised of 120 employees at 4 different universities (Monash, Taylor, Inti, and Sunway University). In order to analyse the responses gathered through the questionnaire, the statistical tool named SPSS was used. For purposes of data analysis and hypotheses testing, several statistical methods such as descriptive analysis, descriptive statistics, correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis were utilized to understand the dimensionality of the variables. The determined findings showed that employees' job satisfaction is positively and significantly impacted by leadership styles, perception towards gender, and working experience. A positive significant relationship between these variables and employees’ job satisfaction was confirmed with leadership styles as the highest influencing factor by employees. The findings of the study would hopefully contribute to the building of new knowledge. Furthermore, it can be useful for human resource development in the education industries. This study provided an additional opportunity for the decision makers to develop and design more effective policies in this area to ensure that the performance of companies still on top.

Keywords: Leadership, Malaysia, Employee Satisfaction, Gender

References:

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57.

Authors:

Mohamed Munawwar Ali, Mazuwin Binti Haja Maideen

Paper Title:

A Study on Factors Inluencing the Adoption of a Crowdsourcing Mobile Application among Generation Y and Z in Maldives

Abstract: The research aims to identify the factors that would influence the Generation Y & Z to adopt a mobile crowdsourcing app in Maldives. The factors studied were i.e. Perceived Usefulness, Social influence, Hedonic Motivation and Perceived risk and its implication on behavioural intention to adopt crowdsourcing app targeted towards housing, repairing, property & maintenance sector among generation Y and Z in Maldives.A total of 107 respondents were selected where 53.77% represented generation Y and 46.73% represented generation Z. All the respondents were employed and thereby receiving some form of income. Four hypotheses were used to test how the factors impact the behavioural intention to adopt crowdsourcing mobile application in Maldives. The hypotheses were analysed using three statistical measures that is the Pearson Correlation, linear regression and ANOVA.Increase in three independent variables which is Perceived usefulness, Social influence and Hedonic motivation resulted in escalation of behavioural intention to adopt crowdsourcing mobile application. Thus, these three behavioural variables were found to have a positive correlation with behavioural intention. On the other hand, Perceived risk which is another independent variable were found to have a negative correlation with behavioural intention, meaning the higher the perception of risk is associated with using the mobile application, the lesser the intention to use the crowdsourcing mobile application will be. Moreover, it was found that Gen Y, the older generation had a higher behavioural intention to adopt the mobile crowdsourcing app with higher perceived usefulness, higher social influence and higher hedonic motivation than the Generation Z the younger generation. Additionally, women were found to have higher perceived risk than men. Yet women were more hedonically motivated than men while men were socially influenced than women in adoption of mobile application.

Keywords: Crowdsourcing Mobile Application, Generation Y and Z, Maldives, repair and maintenance, perceived usefulness, social influence, hedonic motivation, behavioural intention

References:

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Authors:

Nila Chandran Rajandran, Anusuiya Subramaniam, Mazuwin Binti Haja Maideen

Paper Title:

Impact of Job Burnout, Job Security and Organizational Commitment on Turnover Intention among Credit Counseling and Debt Management Agency Employees in Kuala Lumpur

Abstract: The intention of this research was to investigate the impact of Job Burnout, Job Security and Organizational Commitment on Turnover Intention among employees of Credit Counselling and Debt Management Agency in Kuala Lumpur. This research will look in deep on how these elements will impact the employees turnover intention. A total of 106 respondents take part in the data grouping, in which was elected using a snowball sampling from the distribution of the questionnaires throughout the organization in two weeks time. In fact, the data that has been collected were utilized as primary data for this study. Along with that, this research gives several past studies and findings that have been conducted on how the elements will impact the employees turnover intention. The research also has discovered that the elements (Job Burnout, Job Security and Organizational Commitment) are strongly correlated to the turnover intention. This research report can be utilized for an organization, particularly for Credit Counselling and Debt Management Agency to identified the turnover intention of their employees by taking into account on employees job burnout, job security and organizational commitment.

Keywords: Turnover Intention, Job Burnout, Job Security, Organizational Commitment.

References:

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